U.S. Fire Administration Library Citation(s)

 
Call Number:

TH 9213 .N27 S717 2001

An analysis of the effectiveness of the National Fire Academy Executive Fire Officers' Program

Author(s):Soteriou, Nancy Ellen.
Description: 226 p.
Publication Data:Santa Ana, CA : California Coast University. 2001
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 865183503/ Accession No.: 144374
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. NATIONAL FIRE ACADEMY 2. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION 3. EVALUATION
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Management
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

RC 735 .S165 2007

Paramedic endotracheal intubation skills: issues in success, retention, and training

Author(s):Salinger, Susan.
Description: 79 p.
Publication Data:Long Beach, CA : California State University, Long Beach. December 2007
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 861341040/ Title Number: 1451210/ Accession No.: 144091
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. INTUBATION 2. SKILLS 3. PARAMEDICS 4. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING
Summary/abstract:
  • The study used the SJFD Emergency Medical Services paramedic data base to determine the success rates and average intubations per year. The results showed that SJFD paramedics intubate an average of 1.4 times per year. ETI is the advanced airway skill of inserting a tube directly into the lungs to deliver oxygen and medications. The average success rate overall was 67%, and paramedics who had a high volume of calls experienced a higher success rate. There was no indication that the department training had an effect on ETI success. Results also showed that years of prior paramedic experience led to higher success rates, even with low volume.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Science; Reproduction. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2008; Page 40 is not numbered, but the text order follows p. 39 to 41.
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Call Number:

RC 963.5 .H4 C685 2012

A comparison of active and passive cooling methods in firefighters during fireground rehabilitation following a live burn training

Author(s):Colburn Hostler, Deanna.
Description: 80 p.
Publication Data:Pittsburgh, PA : University of Pittsburgh. 2012
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 861502001/ Title Number: 3538024/ Accession No.: 144079
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

PDF

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d-scholarship.pitt.edu/16890/1/ETD_hostler12%2D12UPITT_doc.pdf (1.2mb)
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. LIVE BURNS 3. HEAT STRESS 4. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 5. REHABILITATION 6. COOLING SYSTEMS 7. FIREFIGHTER HEALTH 8. PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS
Summary/abstract:
  • Objective We compared two active cooling devices to passive cooling in a moderate (?22°C) temperature environment on heart rate, core temperature, and perceptions of recovery when applied to firefighters following 20 min. of fire suppression. Methods Firefighters (23 male, 2 female) performed 20 minutes of fire suppression at a live fire evolution. Immediately following the evolution, the subjects removed their thermal protective clothing and were randomized to receive forearm immersion (FI), ice water perfused cooling vest (CV), or passive cooling (P) in an air-conditioned medical trailer for 30 minutes. Heart rate and deep gastric temperature were monitored every five minutes during recovery. OMNI rating of perceived exertion, thermal comfort, thermal stress, sweating, and comfort ratings were all reported every five minutes during recovery.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy; Reproduction. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2013
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Call Number:

47635

Towards the establishment of a worker-centered framework to physically prepare firefighters: the evaluation of movement and the transfer of training

Author(s):Frost, David.
Description: 246 p.
Publication Data:Waterloo, Canada : University of Waterloo. 2013
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 8499066518/ Accession No.: 143072
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

PDF

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hdl.handle.net/10012/7240 (6.3mb)
Subjects:1. FIREFIGHTER SAFETY 2. PHYSICAL FITNESS 3. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 4. INJURY PREVENTION 5. ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS 6. TEST PROCEDURES 7. ERGONOMICS 8. EVALUATION
Summary/abstract:
  • Conclusions: An individual’s movement patterns are variable and influenced by the task and environmental constraints (e.g. speed of movement). Therefore, whether attempting to prevent injury, enhance performance or improve one’s quality of life, any physical preparation program should give adequate consideration to the individuals’ adaptations. When focused solely on the group’s behaviour, there is greater opportunity to skew the interpretation of any findings and overlook several important and potentially novel insights regarding the movement-related adaptations that are exhibited by each individual in response to the particular stimulus, demand, or exercise being investigated. Although several novel insights were provided by the findings of this thesis, the most practical and perhaps influential was that a well-designed exercise program can change an individual’s habitual movement patterns. A group of firefighters with little knowledge or appreciation for how they move, exhibited more control and coordination while performing five whole-body transfer tasks following twelve weeks of training. There is no single exercise or coaching cue that can be used to improve every individual’s capacity; however, one inappropriate recommendation can negate any potential benefit that a program can offer. Consequently, critical to the establishment of a worker-centered framework to physically prepare firefighters is an appreciation for movement and the transfer of training.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy; "Page(s) not included in the original manuscript and are unavailable from the author or university...145-147" - verso.
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Call Number:

47555

Identification of the best methods of firefighter training at the Menomonie Fire Department and Rice Lake Fire Departments

Author(s):Luedtke, Brad.
Description: 68 p.
Publication Data:Menomonie, WI : University of Wisconsin-Stout. December 2009
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 845067774/ Accession No.: 142920
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

PDF

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www2.uwstout.edu/content/lib/thesis/2009/2009luedtkeb.pdf (977.6kb)
Subjects:1. RESERVE FIREFIGHTERS 2. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 3. EFFICIENCY 4. CODES 5. OPINION SURVEYS
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Science
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

47130

Defeating the active shooter: applying facility upgrades in order to mitigate the effects of active shooters in high occupancy facilities

Author(s):Ergenbright, Charles E. and Hubbard, Sean K.
Description: 278 p.
Publication Data:Monterey, CA : Naval Postgraduate School. June 2012
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 826929064/ Accession No.: 142093
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

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hdl.handle.net/10945/7337 (3.5mb)
Subjects:1. ACTIVE SHOOTER 2. GUNS 3. VIOLENCE 4. COLLEGES 5. HIGHER EDUCATION 6. REHABILITATION 7. PREVENTIVE MEASURES 8. CASE STUDIES
Summary/abstract:
  • The average duration of Active Shooter incidents in Institutions of Higher Education within the United States is 12.5 minutes. In contrast, the average response time of campus and local law enforcement to these incidents is 18 minutes. In the majority of Active Shooter incidents affecting U.S. IHEs, the emergency response time greatly exceeds the incident duration and affords law enforcement authorities no opportunity to interdict the shooter or prevent further casualties. This stark contrast between response requirements and response capability produces a considerable delta of dead, injured or potential victims and provides the unfortunate motivation for this project. The primary focus of this project is aimed at reducing the Rate of Kill of Active Shooters in U.S. IHEs. This thesis contains 14 case studies that examine lethal Active Shooter incidents that occurred in U.S. IHEs, as well as the Oslo and Utoya Island Active Shooter event that occurred in Norway. Data analysis on each of these incidents revealed facility composition as a critical vulnerability common to all of these incidents. Accordingly, the recommendations included in this thesis suggest a practical implementation of facility upgrades capable of mitigating the deadly effects of Active Shooters.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Defense Analysis
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Call Number:

LB 1044.9 .T38 W334 2010

Exploring the use of video-teleconferencing for on-duty training in the St. Charles Fire Department and St. Louis metropolitan emergency response community

Author(s):Watkins, Robb F.
Description: 217 p.
Publication Data:St. Charles, MO : Lindenwood University. 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 824685389/ Misc. No.: 3427076/ Accession No.: 141920
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

PDF

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udini.proquest.com/view/exploring-the-use-of-video-goid:769916099/
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. IN SERVICE TRAINING 3. BUDGETING 4. TELECONFERENCES 5. DISASTER RESPONSE
Summary/abstract:
  • This study was conducted because the St. Charles Fire Department needed to identify a way to change its training delivery system to accommodate training in quarters for on-duty companies. St. Charles was experiencing: budget reductions, staffing shortages, delayed responses due to training, and increasing response times. The department identified video teleconferencing (VTC) as a possible solution to their training delivery dilemma. This study was a qualitative study including surveys and interviews that evaluated the VTC implementation process. The research question was, "How can fire department training be constructed to enhance the frequency and adequacy of training and reduce the need for companies to be out of district?" Internal and industry reconnaissance showed that personnel valued response times, the time that elapses between the 911 call for assistance and the arrival of assistance, enough to make changes to their training delivery systems. Local training officers reported shortages in staffing, training support staff, budgets and a lack of organizational support for training. National practitioners in VTC reported similar issues in their organization prior to the implementation of VTC. The literature review, national training officer interview and private sector interviews assisted in building a Best Practices model for emergency training delivery. I implemented this model at the St. Charles Fire Department and recorded the process through field notes, and personal reflections. I concluded by evaluating what worked, what did not work, and what I would do differently next time. The study research revealed that nationwide the fire service was experiencing the same delayed response issues. The VTC solution chosen by the St. Charles Fire Department was able to address many of the issues caused by traditional training models. Changing the training model to utilize VTC allowed the St. Charles Fire Department to enhance the frequency and adequacy of training and reduce the need for companies to be out of district. VTC was not the only identifiable factor in keeping response times low and keeping units in their response areas, but VTC had a positive effect of reducing response times at the St. Charles Fire Department.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education; UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2010
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Call Number:

RC 963 .O22 R782 2011

Noise exposures of firefighters during training activities

Author(s):Root, Kyle.
Description: 42 p.
Publication Data:Fort Collins, CO : Colorado State University. Fall 2011
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 823228012/ Title Number: 1503635/ Accession No.: 141880
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIREFIGHTERS 2. NOISE 3. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 4. DOSIMETERS 5. DATA 6. STANDARDS 7. NIOSH
Summary/abstract:
  • Occupational hearing loss is the most common work-related injury in the United States according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Consequently, NIOSH recommends that occupational noise exposure be among the top occupational hazard research areas of the next century. Firefighters represent a unique population in which noise exposure data are difficult to obtain. The unique settings in which firefighters perform their duties (e.g., inside burning structures) make it difficult to collect noise exposure data and quantify exposures due to environmental factors and unpredictability. Furthermore, firefighting requires that multiple tasks by each participant be accomplished during emergency responses. In order to address the challenge of obtaining personal noise samples from firefighters during emergency situations, this study was conducted to gather firefighter personal noise samples during training exercises that simulated on-scene firefighting tasks. Noise exposure data were collected on five training days during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Two training exercises were executed each day, totaling ten training exercises. Each training exercise averaged 35 minutes in duration and included ten to eleven participants, resulting in ninety-three total personal noise exposure samples. Noise monitoring results showed that none of the ninety-three (100%) firefighter samples were exposed to noise exceeding the Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of an 8-hour time-weighted average (TWA) of 90 dBA. Nine of ninety-three (9.6%) exposures were above the OSHA action level (AL) of 50% dose when extrapolated across an 8-hour workday. Additional analysis was performed after dividing the noise exposure data into three groups consisting of Interior, Exterior, and Engineering categories. This division showed a statistically significant difference (alpha = 0.1) between the interior and engineer categories in relation to noise exposure.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Science; UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2011
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

RA 645.57 .L778 2008

Analysis of a disaster medical track for the Certificate in Emergency Management and Preparedness Program at the University of Texas at Dallas

Author(s):Little, Lynn M.
Description: 127 p.
Publication Data:Houston, TX : University of Texas. Health Science Center at Houston. School of Public Health. May 2008
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 816673812/ Title Number: 1450340/ Accession No.: 141478
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

PDF

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proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=1490075661&Fmt=7&clientId=72813&RQT=309&VName=PQD (441kb)
Subjects:1. DISASTER MEDICINE 2. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 3. DISASTER PREPAREDNESS 4. CERTIFICATION
Summary/abstract:
  • Since the tragic events of September 11, 2001, the United States has engaged in building the infrastructure and developing the expertise necessary to protect its borders and its citizens from further attacks against its homeland. One approach has been the development of academic courses to educate individuals on the nature and dangers of subversive attacks and to prepare them to respond to attacks and other large-scale emergencies in their roles as working professionals, participating members of their communities, and collaborators with first responders. An initial review of the literature failed to reveal any university-based emergency management courses or programs with a disaster medical component, despite the public health significance and need for such programs. In the Fall of 2003, The School of Management at The University of Texas at Dallas introduced a continuing education Certificate in Emergency Management and Preparedness Program. This thesis will (1) describe the development and implementation of a new Disaster Medical Track as a component of this Certificate in Emergency Management and Preparedness Program, (2) analyze the need for and effectiveness of this Disaster Medical Track, and (3) propose improvements in the track based on this analysis.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Public Health; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2008
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

46682

An analysis of factors influencing the achievement of higher education by chief fire officers

Author(s):Ditch, Robert L.
Description: 235 p.
Publication Data:Minneapolis, MN : Walden University. August 2012
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 811140742/ Accession No.: 141248
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE OFFICERS 2. HIGHER EDUCATION 3. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS 4. ADULT EDUCATION 5. PERSONAL GOALS
Summary/abstract:
  • The leadership of the United States Fire Service (FS) believes that higher education increases the professionalism of FS members. The research problem at the research site, which is a multisite fire department located in southeastern United States, was the lack of research-based findings on the factors influencing the achievement of higher education of FS members. The purpose of this study was to identify and understand the factors influencing the achievement of higher education of FS members at the research site. A qualitative multisite case study approach was used. The conceptual framework was based upon the theories of motivational factors, andragogy, and self-direction in adult learning. Purposive sampling was used to identify 20 chief fire officers from 10 fire departments. Data were collected through semi structured interviews that were audio taped and transcribed for content analysis and coding and themes emerged. The findings revealed that the internal motivations of personal gratification of FS members and their desire to learn were the factors influencing their achievement of higher education followed by succession planning. FS leaders can use these findings at the research site to promote higher education among FS members. Implications for positive social change include higher education for FS members by which these members may better manage FS to reduce property damage and human casualties caused by fire. The increased rate of higher education graduation of FS members can support continued advocacy for professional development within the field of FS.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

46111

The need for effective leadership training programs in Maine's volunteer fire services

Author(s):Philbrick, Daniel.
Description: 54 p.
Publication Data:Portland, ME : University of Southern Maine. Lewiston-Auburn College. October 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 774576950/ Accession No.: 138980
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

PDF

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www.library.umaine.edu/theses/pdf/PhilbrickD2010.pdf (1.5mb)
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE MANAGEMENT 2. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 3. VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENTS 4. LEADERSHIP
Summary/abstract:
  • This study focuses on the need for effective leadership in a rural all-volunteer fire department. The need for effective leadership is critical with today’s volunteer service organizations. This study surveyed the viewpoints of current members of volunteer fire organizations in Maine. The results of this study demonstrate a need for effective leadership training for chiefs of all-volunteer departments. The responses and data gathered are intended to serve as the basis for further study to initiate leadership training for leaders of all-volunteer fire departments. A majority of respondents felt mandatory leadership training should be required for anyone assuming the position of chief and would support any such training program. While the majority of respondents felt their current chief was an effective leader, the study recommends several possible future directions to explore this subject further.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Leadership Studies
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

RC 480.5 .D261 2005

The development of an educational program that teaches fire fighters stress management

Author(s):Davis, Katherine.
Description: 125 p.
Publication Data:Chicago, IL : Chicago School of Professional Psychology. June 28, 2005
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 299803420/ Title Number: 3177410/ Accession No.: 137232
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIREFIGHTER HEALTH 2. STRESS 3. WELLNESS PROGRAMS 4. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Psychology; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2005
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

45440

Fire and emergency services professional development in the state of Illinois

Author(s):Schaumleffel, William Benjamin.
Description: 81 p.
Publication Data:Carbondale, IL : Southern Illinois University. May 2011
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 728024421/ Accession No.: 137261
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE 2. DISASTER RESPONSE 3. PROFESSIONALISM 4. ORGANIZATIONS 5. CONFERENCES 6. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Education
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

44913

Formal critiques and after action reports from conventional emergencies: tools for homeland security training and education

Author(s):Chattin, Jody.
Description: 113 p.
Publication Data:Monterey, CA : Naval Postgraduate School. September 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 671491826/ Accession No.: 136129
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

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edocs.nps.edu/npspubs/scholarly/theses/2010/Sep/10Sep_Chattin.pdf (486.4kb)
Subjects:1. AFTER ACTION REPORTS 2. HOMELAND SECURITY 3. EDUCATION 4. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING
Summary/abstract:
  • The activities and tasks performed by firefighters when responding to emergencies caused by asymmetric threats to homeland security mirror the activities and tasks that firefighters regularly employ when responding to conventional emergencies. However, the learning opportunities created by conventional incidents are not routinely exploited for the purposes of preparing firefighters to respond to incidents of asymmetric origin. Instead, homeland security training and education is often conducted in a manner that is stand-alone and requires a dedicated budget. The policy analysis conducted assesses the similarities and differences between mitigation procedures and technical skills used when responding to incidents of similar nature but different origin and whether or not formal critiques and after action reports from conventional incidents can be used to effectively support the long-term sustainment of specialized training and education. Efficiency, process values, and robustness and improvability are the criterion used to conduct a modified cost-benefit analysis. The findings suggest that expanding the scope of formal critiques and after action reports from conventional incidents to include "what if" questions about potential incidents of asymmetric origin does facilitate the long-term sustainment of specialized training and education programs in a manner that capitalizes on adult and organizational learning theory principles.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for degree of Master of Arts in Security Studies, Homeland Security and Defense
Availability:Not available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9504 .P4 M619 1993

A plan for the Allentown Fire Academy that will show its potential as an institution of education and learninig which will meet the needs of the attending firefighters and the communities they serve

Author(s):Mickley, Brian P.
Description: 262 p.
Publication Data:Kutztown, PA : University of Pennsylvania. December 1993
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 37396979/ Title Number: EP21630/ Accession No.: 135979
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. TRAINING PROGRAMS 3. NEEDS ASSESSMENT 4. INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES 5. STANDARDS 6. NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Public Administration; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2007
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

LB 1738 .H125 2009

How new, full-time, fire technology instructors in California community colleges learned about the teaching/learning process: a mixed method study

Author(s):Hadsell, Cliff W.
Description: 234 p.
Publication Data:Lincoln, NE : University of Nebraska. May 2009
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 501000051/ Title Number: 3352769/ Accession No.: 135974
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE TECHNOLOGY 2. INSTRUCTORS 3. TEACHING 4. LESSONS LEARNED 5. PROCEDURES 6. COLLEGES 7. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION
Summary/abstract:
  • The purpose of this mixed method study was to determine how new, full-time fire technology faculty members at community colleges in California learned about the teaching/learning process and what expectations they had for teacher training to be provided by their institution, and to replicate a previous study done by Deborah Brennan earlier in 2002 using occupational instructors. The quantitative portion of the study examined specifically what methods they used to learn about the teaching/learning process and what formal teacher training preparation was expected and available to them. The qualitative portion further examined the ways they learned about the teaching/learning process. A survey designed and developed by Deborah Brennan, PhD (2002) was used to collect data on the new faculty members' expectations for training. There were significant differences between the expectations of fire technology instructors for receiving and the actual training received in the areas of classroom instruction, curriculum development, developing philosophy of teaching, writing a course syllabus, preparing course materials, writing tests, evaluating student performance on tests, and assessing test effectiveness. The study reinforced many of Dr. Brennan's findings of occupational instructors in mid-western states. The areas of expectations were exactly the same with the exception of advising program majors. The study also found that 75% of fire-technology instructors had a mentor assigned versus 34% of mid-west occupational instructors. All of the California community colleges provided training through faculty orientation, in-services, workshops, and by requiring professional development plans for faculty members. Two-thirds of the interview informants reported the training needed more focus. The new faculty members identified areas in which they needed training, including areas such as; college policies on student conduct, and using computers in instruction. They suggested the training be held over one to three days and be delivered in a flexible format for newly hired faculty. All respondents had previous teaching experience in fire and life safety, and many had taught as adjunct faculty for many years.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2009; Cover has "methods" inaccurately printed in title.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9146 .S396 2005

Train to retain: what organizational practices of volunteer fire departments influence and enhance the retention of their members?

Author(s):Schut, Frank.
Description: 132 p.
Publication Data:Victoria, Canada : Royal Roads University. July 2005
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 656882297/ ISBN: 0-494-09456-7/ Accession No.: 135594
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENTS 2. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 3. PERSONNEL RETENTION
Summary/abstract:
  • My project is a study into the practices and factors of volunteer fire departments (VFDs) that may affect the retention and loss of their members. This study's data were collected through a combination of 11 one-to-one interviews and questionnaires. The collected data helped reveal why (a)?people joined a VFD; (b)?members stayed active in the fire service; (c)?some VFD members remained longer than most others; and (d)?some members left in spite of their once-high interest in serving. Understanding many of the reasons people make their choices in joining, staying, or leaving their local VFD allowed me to compile several recommendations that could help avoid or reduce some of the problems that cause members to leave the fire service and consequently should help preserve and enhance the interest in serving a local VFD for both current and potential members.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Leadership and Training; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9123.7 .B196 2009

Exploring a policy of mandatory fire fighter certification in Pennsylvania

Author(s):Balsamo, Robert.
Description: 93 p.
Publication Data:s.l. : Empire State College. State University of New York. 2009
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 645453545/ Title Number: 1466969/ Accession No.: 135278
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIREFIGHTER SAFETY 2. CERTIFICATION 3. PENNSYLVANIA
Summary/abstract:
  • This thesis examines the implications of instituting a policy of mandatory certification in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to help reduce the number of Line Of Duty Deaths in Pennsylvania. Historically the training in the Pennsylvania fire service and the lack of regulations mandating training has left the fire service fragmented and Pennsylvania's form of government also contributes to a fragmented system of regulation in the fire service. Using interviews from Pennsylvania's leaders in the fire service, research from the United States Fire Administration and the Pennsylvania government study both the positive and negatives of this policy are examined. While doing research for the paper a coloration was found from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) administration. NIOSH is charged with investigating line of duty deaths in the fire service. The coloration showed that if the fire fighter, driver operator and the fire officer were all certified at minimum levels from the National Fire Protection Associations (NFPA) consensus standards they would have a one in two chance of dying in the line of duty. Conversely if one or none of the fire personnel were not certified their chance of dying in the line of duty rises to a two in one chance. From the research in this paper a need for this policy is evident and the challenges there would be in implementing it.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Labor and Policy Studies; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2009
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

44484

Setting academic fires: towards a best practice graduate curriculum for fire studies

Author(s):Moschella, John Michael.
Description: 193 p.
Publication Data:Cambridge, MA : Cambridge College. August 2008
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 639931327/ Accession No.: 135098
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION 2. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 3. BEST PRACTICES
Summary/abstract:
  • In 1966 the attendees of the first Wingspread Conference concluded that the more educated the firefighter, the more professional the fire service. Stating that professional status begins with education, the assemblage recommended that a systematic and deliberate educational program was the surest approach to professionalism. The problem was whether the objective of Wingspread I has been met in the form of a best practice curricular body of knowledge, something necessary to any profession, especially the fire service. The purpose of this research was to determine the existence of a best practice graduate curriculum. The research question was: To what extent does a best practice curricular body of knowledge exist across fire centric graduate programs? The literature review traced four strands: the evolution of education in the fire service; the journey from novice to expert--what it takes to gain expertise; best practice--how is it defined and what constitutes it; and is there a universal across nations--are there certain constructs which are common across different cultures? The research included the 7 American colleges offering a fire centric degree, as well as 12 programs from outside the United States. The findings were that the American programs emphasized research, management, and administration while the international graduate programs emphasized engineering. Notwithstanding, there is a best practice graduate curriculum, albeit unintentional, which can be found. The core courses are: Research, Management, Law, Planning, and Finance. Five peripherals were also found: Organizational Theory, Leadership, Administration, Ethics, and Public Policy. Considering the credits needed for graduation, expertise, aside from experience, would comprise of 30 credits, giving three credits per course and ten courses per best practice. The question of universal across cultures was answered by concluding that Taiwan and the United States, although employing different entry systems, both offer a graduate curriculum rich in management and administration courses. In addition, England stresses an engineering curriculum while similar to the United States in a single tiered entry system. There are several characteristics necessary for professionalism, one of which is a curricular body of knowledge. If the findings of this research are accepted, then the argument that a best practice body of knowledge exists in fire graduate study will fill this requirement.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

RC 86.7 .G4 G761 2006

Connecting emergency medical technician competence to training program contexts and methods

Author(s):Grant, Frederic J.
Description: 221 p.
Publication Data:Minneapolis, MN : Capella University. June 2006
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 589532460/ Title Number: 3216030/ Accession No.: 134653
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS 2. SKILLS 3. TRAINING PROGRAMS 4. PROCEDURES 5. EVALUATION 6. GEORGIA 7. AIRWAY MANAGEMENT 8. TRAUMA
Summary/abstract:
  • The purpose of this study was to develop information regarding how Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) training in Georgia could be improved. The study consisted of two stages. Stage one developed statistical information regarding Georgia's EMT training programs. Based upon the stage one results, a sampling pool of higher performing EMT training programs was identified. Stage two consisted of a comparative case study analysis of three of the higher performing programs. Analysis results from stage one indicated that all Georgia EMT training programs could benefit from a strategic focus on breathing and airway, and trauma curricular areas. Analysis results from stage two revealed that higher EMT performing training programs shared some commonalties in their instructional methods, materials, and organizational contexts. These commonalties suggested a number of areas for future research.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy ; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2006
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9310.8 .B784 2006

Command decision making: a training needs assessment

Author(s):Bowden, Michael W.
Description: 115 p.
Publication Data:Long Beach, CA : California State University. December 2006
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 264686237/ Title Number: 1442622/ Accession No.: 134657
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. DECISION MAKING 2. FIREGROUND COMMAND 3. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING
Summary/abstract:
  • In the fire service, the first arriving officer at an emergency scene is responsible for taking charge. During the initial stages, the scene is often confusing and chaotic. Incident commanders are responsible for making critical decisions throughout the incident, often with incomplete information and under severe time constraints. The study's objective was to assess the need for command decision-making training for incident commanders. A survey was sent to fire officers from several departments across the United States in order to obtain a wide sampling of training needs. A large majority indicated they did indeed need further training in both command decision making and a variety of related areas. With increased demands for emergency services in various specialized areas, the fire service would do well to develop additional training programs to ensure their fire officers are well prepared to make the tough decisions needed to save life and property.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Masters of Science in Emergency Services Administration ; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2007
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9123 .I28 2008

Master's degree as a requirement for U.S. metropolitan fire chiefs

Author(s):Iliescu, Sorin.
Description: 187 p.
Publication Data:Providence, RI : Johnson & Wales University. 2008
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 320475034/ Misc. No.: 3344303/ Accession No.: 134001
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE CHIEFS 2. URBAN AREAS 3. EMPLOYMENT CRITERIA 4. COLLEGES 5. CAREER DEVELOPMENT 6. SURVEYS 7. HIGHER EDUCATION 8. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION
Summary/abstract:
  • To promote recognition of the fire service as a profession, the United States Fire Administration created the Fire and Emergency Service Higher Education (FESHE) Curriculum Committee in 1998. The move coincided with the explosion of higher education programs in fire science across the country, which resulted in 222 two-year, 29 four-year, and 7 master's programs by 2001. Expansion fostered wide diversity in program content. To achieve a certain quality level and to expedite course transferability, FESHE adopted model two-year and four-year program curricula. However, FESHE has not adopted a model graduate program, even though, increasingly, the master's degree has become a requirement for fire chief positions, particularly in large metropolitan areas. The aims of this research were to determine the acceptability of a master's degree as a basic requirement for U.S. metropolitan fire chiefs and to define the needed degree components, in order to promote the fire service as a profession. This study focused on answering two major questions: (1) Should the master's degree be required for U.S. metropolitan fire chiefs? (2) What should be the components of a master's degree in fire science? To address these questions, data were collected from three target populations: directors of the fire science master's programs ( N = 7), metropolitan fire chiefs ( N = 95), and municipal chief administrators ( N = 84). Information was also collected from catalogs and Web sites about existing master's degree programs in fire science. Data collection instruments included forms for recording catalogs' information and questionnaires for each of the three target populations. Responses were analyzed and grouped into two categories: determining perceptions of the desirability of requiring the master's degree for metropolitan fire chiefs and whether these perceptions are related to the characteristics of the respondents, and defining the content of a model fire science master's degree program, which could be used as a national model. Data analyses provided strong evidence that the metropolitan fire chiefs and the municipal chief administrators agreed that a higher education degree should be job requirement for fire service leaders and that specific components were essential for such a degree.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2009
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9158 .R521 2003

The affects of fire service training methods on leadership development and organizational culture

Author(s):Richardson, Robert Craig.
Description: 82 p.
Publication Data:Victoria, British Columbia, Canada : Royal Roads University. April 2003
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 55742635/ ISBN: 0-612-77819-3/ Accession No.: 132748
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. LEADERSHIP 3. OFFICER DEVELOPMENT 4. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9124 .C692 1994

The evolution of California fire service training and education

Author(s):Coleman, Ronny J.
Description: 272 p.
Publication Data:Long Beach, CA: California State University. May 1994
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 31095807/ Order Number: 1357696/ Accession No.: 131932
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION 3. CALIFORNIA 4. FIRE SERVICE HISTORY
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Arts; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 1994
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9124 .B236 2009

Evaluating the impact of fire department accreditation

Author(s):Barbieri, Joseph S.
Description: 80 p.
Publication Data:Paxton, MA : Anna Maria College. May 2009
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 334196426/ Accession No.: 131744
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. ACCREDITATION 2. FIRE DEPARTMENTS 3. INSURANCE SERVICES OFFICE 4. QUALITY CONTROL 5. MODELS 6. PLANNING 7. PROFESSIONALISM 8. EDUCATION
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Fire Science and Administration; Evaluation of Commission on Fire Accreditation International accreditation and the self-assessment manual
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9124 .C2 M829 2006

Evaluating of fire service instructors and curriculum

Author(s):Moreno, Robert.
Description: 71 p.
Publication Data:Long Beach, CA : California State University. December 2006
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 263084476/ Title Number: 1442636/ Accession No.: 131272
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION 2. INSTRUCTORS 3. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 4. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 5. EVALUATION 6. CALILFORNIA 7. FIRE SERVICE HISTORY
Summary/abstract:
  • This study concerned evaluation of fire service instructors and curriculum in the California fire service training and education system. Using the documentary research method, the study analyzed data from past and present officials, official historical documents, interviews, newsletters, and official publications. The research reviewed the history or evolution of the system and the philosophy behind the implementation plan, followed by a review of the current system. The current system is much more complicated than the original system in 1920. The variety of expectations from educational institutions and public safety organizations regarding how they define training and education for the fire service is still not standardized enough to clearly define how to resolve the issues of instructor evaluation and curriculum review and assessments on a more global level. This research was an attempt to find a resolution to the barriers that were identified in the current delivery system.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Social Work; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2007
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

42805

Performance and injury predictability during firefighter candidate training

Author(s):Burton, Samuel Lee.
Description: 73 p.
Publication Data:Blacksburg, VA : Virginia Tech. February 2006
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 70579458/ Accession No.: 130823
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-02132006-123900/ (1.6mb)
Subjects:1. PHYSICAL FITNESS 2. ANATOMY 3. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 4. PHYSICAL FITNESS 5. INJURIES 6. FORECASTING
Summary/abstract:
  • The purpose of this study was to determine if a firefighter's fundamental movement patterns can act as predictors for occupational injury and performance during the firefighter academy training. The study consisted of 23 firefighter candidates entering the 16-week firefighter academy training. The firefighter candidates', VO2Max, 1.5 mile-run and Firefighter Physical Conditioning Course and movement patterns were assessed at the on-set of the 16-week training. The firefighter movement patterns were assessed utilizing the Functional Movement Screen, which was designed to identify flaws in fundamental movement patterns. The firefighter candidates were then observed and their injuries documented during the firefighter academy training. The injury results as well as the initial performance tests were then compared to the results obtained by the Functional Movement Screen. There were no significant findings when comparing the Functional Movement Screen to the performance tests. The only significant correlation was with the Functional Movement Screen asymmetry score and the Firefighter Physical Conditioning Course. The relationship between the injuries recorded and Functional Movement Screen scores were inconclusive. The results of this study were unable to determine if a movement-based assessment such as the Functional Movement Screen can be utilized as an injury or performance predictor tool. The findings determined that further research needs to be performed with efforts placed on larger population groups and more emphasis placed on the scoring and analysis criteria used by the movement-based assessment.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
Availability:Not available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9123 .T192 2007

Description and evaluation of current fire service training materials development

Author(s):Tarr, Sara E.
Description: 344 p.
Publication Data:Syracuse, NY : Syracuse University. May 2007
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 263095106/ Title Number: 3266322/ Accession No.: 130511
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. TRAINING AIDS 3. EVALUATION 4. FIREFIGHTER FATALITIES 5. FIREFIGHTER INJURIES 6. ADULT EDUCATION
Summary/abstract:
  • This study addresses the constant and compelling issue of on-the-job accidents and fatalities of firefighters. Line of duty deaths (LODDs) have remained essentially steady (100+ each year for the last decade) despite heightened attention to the issue and a seemingly decreased risk due to a significant reduction in the number of structure fires. LODD prevention is a central component of firefighter training and is linked to three key job performance factors: training, motivation, and work culture. Attempts to alter the trend of LODDs have included modifications in the training curricula and have had no real effect. According to fire service literature cultural change is required, including that part of the culture that creates training materials. The study addresses this concern by asking Does the process of design and development of firefighter training materials reflect competency-based methods? From an instructional and curriculum development perspective, the study can be viewed as a front-end analysis of practitioners' approach to training materials development. The study was organized around commercial publishers of training materials. Data collection employed methods of non-participant observations and interviews and data analysis consisted of gap analysis with an evaluation of the training materials development practices as they compared with industry-validated curriculum and instructional development standards. The study produced rich results with multiple theoretical and practical implications. First, it produced descriptive results about actual practices. Second, it applied theoretical principles of adult and vocational education, social learning, and human performance technology. Third, the study drew conclusions about gaps in the practices and formed a model for future instructional and curriculum development. Publishers and fire service institutions can employ this theory-based model to develop training materials that reflect relevant changes in the fire service and move to decrease the risk of LODD by improving the transfer of knowledge and skills during firefighter training.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2007
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

42649

Altering the mission statement: the training of firefighters as intelligence gatherers

Author(s):Blatus, Richard J.
Description: 70 p.
Publication Data:Monterey, CA : Naval Postgraduate School. September 2008
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 268675195/ Accession No.: 130421
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA488633&Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf (313kb)
Subjects:1. MISSION STATEMENTS 2. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 3. NEEDS ASSESSMENT 4. INTELLIGENCE 5. TERRORISM 6. HOMELAND SECURITY
Summary/abstract:
  • The fire service is one of the premier emergency response agencies in the United States. As our nation strives to expand and enhance its homeland security efforts, firefighters have been recognized as an underutilized asset. The opportunity for firefighters to act as "first preventers" in the war on terrorism is unmatched by any other emergency response agency. This, coupled with the warrantless search provisions afforded firefighters by the Constitution, makes firefighters the logical choice for training and inclusion into an expanded terrorism awareness initiative. Expansion of the intelligence-gathering capabilities of first responders, specifically firefighters, will not be without difficulty. The lack of training and educational opportunities afforded firefighters in this area, the changes in firefighting culture, the status of firefighters as an integral part of the community, are all obstacles that must be addressed. Firefighters respond to homes and businesses with unprecedented frequency. A multi-faceted approach involving training, community involvement, and operational awareness will streamline the utilization of firefighters in the area of threat recognition. Trained firefighters will help shoulder some of the burden placed on law enforcement while the utilization of a current asset will put forth a new best practice for the safety of our communities.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Security Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9182 .H353 2005

Risk management and loss control: reducing firefighter injury and death during training activities

Author(s):Haas, Christopher P.
Description: 99 p.
Publication Data:Long Beach, CA : California State University. January 2005
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 70634596/ Title Number: 1426249/ Accession No.: 124085
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. RISK MANAGEMENT 2. LOSS PREVENTION 3. FIREFIGHTER INJURIES 4. FIREFIGHTER FATALITIES 5. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING
Summary/abstract:
  • The fire service pursues development of exotic firefighter rescue and survival techniques without application of a risk management process to evaluate risk versus gain or compliance with codes, standards, and applicable laws. Due to limited expertise, increasing responsibilities, and limited resources of time, personnel, and budget dollars, many departments have failed to develop, adopt, and implement a comprehensive risk management plan. A review of the literature and a survey led to conclusions regarding prevailing risk management policies and loss experience in connection with training activities. The results of this study determined a need to heighten awareness of fire service executives regarding the risks associated with training activities and potential consequences of these risks. It was recommended that a Fire Service Risk Management course be added to the California Fire Service Training and Education System.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Science; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2006
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

38887

Terrorism awareness and education as a prevention strategy for first responders

Author(s):Welch, Alicia L.
Description: 129 p.
Publication Data:Monterey, CA : Naval Postgraduate School. March 2006
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 66527755/ Accession No.: 121289
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.hsdl.org/homesec/docs/theses/06Mar_Welch.pdf (463.2kb)
Subjects:1. TERRORISM 2. FIRST RESPONDERS 3. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 4. PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Summary/abstract:
  • Fire service personnel are ideally suited to contribute to the concerted national effort of homeland security. If they intend to be an effective component of this effort then a revamping of existing preparedness activities must occur. This thesis will analyze the effectiveness of the Los Angeles Fire Department's counterterrorism efforts to date. The central argument is that much more needs to be accomplished in the area of prevention strategies. The way ahead will require an analysis of the impediments to change which continue to obstruct the department's progress toward preventative measures. Barriers discussed herein are leadership, firefighting culture, lack of training and educational opportunities, and ineffective use of community involvement. The citizens of the United States have benefited from awareness and prevention programs in the past. Three models were considered to determine which attributes could be extracted and used to construct the foundation for a terrorism prevention model. Frameworks used in some nationally recognized agendas were studied in order to draw information for the development of a terrorism awareness program for first responders. Relative to each of these issues, a recommended course of action specific to the LAFD will be outlined in considerable detail.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Security Studies
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

HD 6971 .R621 2004

A comparative analysis of the likely impact of an accreditation process between professional fire fighters and city/county managers

Author(s):Rivero, Mark A.
Description: 199 p.
Publication Data:Las Vegas, NV : University of Nevada. May 2004
Identifier/s:Title Number: 3143388/ Accession No.: 118654/ OCLC Record No.: 61226063
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. ACCREDITATION 2. FIREFIGHTERS 3. CITY MANAGERS 4. NEEDS ASSESSMENT 5. COST EFFECTIVENESS
Summary/abstract:
  • The fire service has evolved from an organization whose single responsibility was fire suppression to an emergency services organization that provides fire inspection, fire prevention, fire code enforcement, fire investigations, emergency medical services (basic through advance life support), hazardous materials mitigation, and specialized rescue operations. With these increased responsibilities come some of the greatest response challenges in our history. Professionalism is the key to our present and to our future (Strickland, R. J. 1995).;Today, the fire service is changing rapidly from a purely hands on, skill-building career to one of a sophisticated public service that deals with hazardous materials, deadly structural and wild-land fires, and emergency medical situations. This study has analyzed the fire service accreditation process of the paid professional departments in the western region of the United States.;The Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) is the first fire service accreditation agency of which its sole purpose is to evaluate fire departments in a specialized, vocational educational setting. Also, the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training (ACCET) is an agency that evaluates academic programs on the institutional level such as colleges, universities and other types of post-secondary schools. Both agencies were examined in their evaluations of the accreditation process and its criteria in three specific areas: (1) finance, (2) curriculum, and (3) instructional staff.;The effects of these criteria were reviewed through questionnaires completed by two main groups: (1) city-county managers who supervise fire departments and, (2) various levels of fire chiefs in paid, not volunteer departments, as the other important group. Data were gathered from fire departments within the western states of Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Idaho, Alaska, Montana, Oregon, and Washington.;The results of the critical analysis of CFAI and ACCET codes and those of related agencies were evaluated to determine if accreditation standards address the potential effects on the curriculum development, finance, and the instructional staff of a fire department. The results of the survey of city-county managers and fire chiefs were used to develop a profile of expert opinions regarding the adequacy and efficacy of these standards. The benefits of accreditation thus identified were used to recommend a model accreditation condition for heightened academic improvements; upgrading a fire department's status; providing local, state, and national recognition; as well as boosting morale within the fire department's administration and staff.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2004
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9151 .C27 L841 2004

The development of the California State Fire Marshal's fire chief certification program

Author(s):Lombardo, Gregory T.
Description: 231 p.
Publication Data:Long Beach, CA : California State University. December 2004
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 60686740/ Accession No.: 118420
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE CHIEFS 2. CERTIFICATION 3. CALIFORNIA
Notes:In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

37695

Effectiveness of the Executive Fire Officer Program on selected attributes of program graduates

Author(s):Wolf, Dennis.
Description: 65 p. + 1 compact disk
Publication Data:Phoenix, AZ : Grand Canyon University. November 2004
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 117659/ OCLC Record No.: 60337042
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION 2. SKILLS 3. EVALUATION 4. SURVEYS
Summary/abstract:
  • Little research has been done to determine if the Executive Fire Officer Program is successfully meeting its goals of providing fire service leaders with the knowledge, skills and abilities to be transformational leaders, conduct research and engage in lifelong learning. The specific skills measured in this study, taken from the Executive Fire Officer Program course materials, were: goal setting; setting high expectations; mentoring; transformational leadership; life long learning; and organizational commitment. This study collected self-reported data on Executive Fire Officer Program graduates who completed the Executive Fire Officer Program in 1998, and analyzed the data to determine if statistically significant changes occurred in selected knowledge, skills and abilities of the graduates by comparing their performance before and after completing the program. The study used descriptive research methodology and collected data through detailed questionnaires. The results showed that participation in the Executive Fire Officer Program was a positive factor in the reported increase in all attributes measured in this study. The study analyzed the types of organizational commitment displayed by the respondents, identified affective commitment as the most positive type of commitment, and found an increase in the organizational commitment levels of the respondents. The study recommends that the federal government continue to fund the Executive Fire Officer program since the program is making a significant difference in the professional development of fire service leaders.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9158 .C891 2004

Learning actions of fire fighters using best practices

Author(s):Crandell, Brian Martin.
Description: 129 p.
Publication Data:Bozeman, MT : Montana State University. April 2004
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 55858693/ Title Number: 3127705/ Accession No.: 117294
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. FIREFIGHTER SAFETY 3. ADULT EDUCATION 4. BENCHMARKING
Summary/abstract:
  • Identifies and describes the learning actions and learning sources used by a selected group of firefighters in Montana who are recognized as using best practices in preparing a safe and competent workforce.
Notes:In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/Proquest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2004
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9124 .L85 K47 2003

The redesign of the Long Beach Fire Department's Recruit Firefighter Training Academy

Author(s):Kiesewetter, Thomas J.
Publication Data:Long Beach, CA : California State University. August 2003
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 115923/ OCLC Record No.: 53826333
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.lbfdtraining.com/Information/learningtheories/lbfdthesis/thesis.pdf (1.9 mb)
Subjects:1. RECRUITMENT 2. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 3. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT 4. TRAINING FACILITIES
Series Data:Dissertation
Summary/abstract:
  • The objective of this study was twofold: (a) to reformulate the Long Beach Fire Department (LBFD) Recruit Firefighter Training Academy's program of instruc-tion to meet contemporary fire service curriculum design standards, and (b) to document this development process. Using action and documentary research methods, the study provides a compre-hensive curriculum development model. Selected educational theories and "best prac-tices" combined with job-related standards and a continuous improvement process resulted in a valid, high-performance program of instruction. Evaluations of Levels I, II, and III support this conclusion. The study should become mandatory reading for the LBFD Training Division officers and it should be disseminated widely in the field. Future studies should include longitudinal evaluations and criterion-referenced studies, among others. The researcher's reflections on the study's implications conclude the report.
Notes:Thesis M.A.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

TH 9124 .S524 2002

A critical analysis of the fire accreditation process to discover if it impacts the effectiveness of paid, public fire departments

Author(s):Shackelford, Ray O.
Description: 220 p.
Publication Data:La Verne, CA : University of La Verne. April 2002
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 51341391/ Misc. No.: UMI number: 3045682/ Accession No.: 113414
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. ACCREDITATION 2. BENCHMARKING 3. EVALUATION 4. FIRE DEPARTMENTS 5. QUALITY CONTROL
Notes:Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, Doctor of Public Administration
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: CIRCULATION - BOOKS [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

34927

An assessment of computer-based training for EMT re-certification

Author(s):Somers, Scott C.
Description: 134 p.
Publication Data:Tempe, AZ : Arizona State University. December 2002
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 52864257/ Accession No.: 109064
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. CERTIFICATION 2. COMPUTER ASSISTED INSTRUCTION 3. EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS 4. PHOENIX, AZ
Notes:In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree master of science in technology
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

34477

The identification and validation of a task inventory of field performance criteria to be used as the bases for the development of an Illinois statewide firefighter certification testing program

Author(s):Suksi, James.
Description: 143 p.
Publication Data:Carbondale, IL : Southern Illinois University. July 1977
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 03734897/ Accession No.: 108187
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. CERTIFICATION 2. FIREFIGHTERS 3. ILLINOIS 4. TEST PROCEDURES
Notes:In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2002
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

34473

Training needs of avocational firefighters: current practices, methods, and implications for programming

Author(s):Schultz, Robert Francis.
Description: 160 p.
Publication Data:Ann Arbor, MI : University of Michigan. 1985
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 52714747/ Misc. No.: 8600547/ Accession No.: 108202
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. NEEDS ASSESSMENT 3. TRAINING PROGRAMS 4. VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTERS
Notes:In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, education; Authorized facsimile. UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2002
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

33757

A handbook to train members of fire departments in the state of New Jersey to use the microcomputer based National Fire Incident Reporting System

Author(s):Onieal, Denis G.
Description: 214 p.
Publication Data:New York, NY : New York University. 1990
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 24230596/ Misc. No.: 9113103/ Accession No.: 106463
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. DATA PROCESSING 2. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 3. HANDBOOKS 4. NATIONAL FIRE INCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM 5. NEW JERSEY
Notes:On title page: "Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education in the School of Education, Health, Nursing, and Arts Professions"; Authorized facsimile from UMI Dissertation Services/ProQuest. Ann Arbor, MI. 2002
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

33589

A study of core functions of emergency management as reflected in training requirements for professional certification

Author(s):Green, Walter G.
Description: 233 p.
Publication Data:s.l. : The Graduate School of America. May 1999
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 48147828/ Misc. No.: UMI 9955893/ Accession No.: 106093
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. CERTIFICATION 2. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 3. TRAINING
Notes:Authorized facsimile from the microfilm master copy of the original dissertation, printed by UMI Dissertation Services, Ann Arbor, MI, 2002
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

32105

A study of undergraduate fire service degree programs in the United States - Fall 2000

Author(s):Sturtevant, Thomas B.
Description: 150 p. (1-136)
Publication Data:Knoxville, TN : University of Tennessee. May 2001
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 47353377/ Accession No.: 102879/ Accession No.: 102880/ Accession No.: 102881
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. COLLEGES 2. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION 3. HIGHER EDUCATION
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
  • c.2: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
  • c.3: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

31969

A survey study of exploring reception in privatizing human resource function in the fire service in Genesee County

Author(s):Lewis, Vincent M.
Description: 63 p.
Publication Data:Mount Pleasant, MI : Central Michigan University. April 8, 2001
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 47235031/ Accession No.: 102546
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. DATA 2. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 3. MICHIGAN 4. PRIVATIZATION 5. REGIONAL DISTRICTS 6. SURVEYS
Notes:Submitted in partial fulfillment of requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Administration concentration in human resources
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

30254

College credit for fire training: a case study

Author(s):Sa'adah, A. D. Rafael.
Description: 22 p.
Publication Data:Washington, DC : University of the District of Columbia. College of Professional Studies. December 1, 1998
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 43868118/ Accession No.: 95859
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. CASE STUDIES 2. EDUCATION 3. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION 4. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING
Series Data:Planning in government
Notes:In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Public Administration degree
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

25767

Fire service accreditation: issues and impacts on local fire departments

Author(s):Mullen, Patrick J.
Description: 57 p.
Publication Data:Naperville, IL : The Author. April 1995
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 35521563/ Accession No.: 82016
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. ACCREDITATION 2. FIRE DEPARTMENTS
Notes:A master's research paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Public Administration, Governors State University, College of Business and Public Administration, Division of Public Administration.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

24836

The Hanford fire department training program

Author(s):Proctor, James R.
Description: 100 p.
Publication Data:Hanford, CA : The Author. October 26, 1994
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 79451/ OCLC Record No.: 667613914
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. FIRE DEPARTMENTS 2. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 3. HANFORD, CA
Notes:A thesis report presented to the faculty of Fresno Pacific College in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

3653

A review and analysis of participant reaction to the university Civil Defense Extension Training Program in the state of Florida

Author(s):Goerke, Glenn A.
Description: 140 p.
Publication Data:East Lansing, MI : Michigan State University. College of Education. 1964
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 025322827/ Accession No.: 55770
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. CIVIL DEFENSE 2. PUBLIC OPINION 3. TRAINING PROGRAMS
Notes:Dissertation available through UMI, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

18219

A comparative analysis of methods used in preparation for occupational testing

Author(s):Cox, Donald L.
Description: 77 p.
Publication Data:Ames, IA : Iowa State University. 1991
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 24238575/ Accession No.: 65020
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. APTITUDE TESTS 2. CERTIFICATION 3. EMPLOYMENT
Summary/abstract:
  • Acceptable and recognized methods utilized to develop competency and prepare for occupational testing are strongly controlled by certifying agencies. Teachers, law enforcement officers, medical personnel and firefighters, to name a few, operate under specific guidelines for training requirements to qualify for professional certification. Most certification examinations are competency based tests. What methods of preparation a certifying agency recognizes may severely restrict an individual's option to develop competency. This research thesis specifically investigates firefighter certification and methods of preparation to develop competency. Over five-hundred Iowa firefighter candidates from 1989 to 1991 were studied. Written examination scores were collected along with various demographic information. Specific hypotheses studied involved methods of preparation; years of experience; volunteer vs. career firefighters; and gender of the candidates.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

27869

Fire officer seminar: a curriculum designed for novice fire company officers

Author(s):Haverty, Dan Michael.
Description: 197 p.
Publication Data:Sacramento, CA : The Author. Spring 1996
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 85985/ OCLC Record No.: 667612255
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. COMPANY OFFICERS 2. FIRE OFFICERS 3. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING
Notes:A project submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in a special major Public Agency Communication at California State University, Sacramento.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

13740

Firefighter certification and training in Kansas: the possibility of better coordination and cooperation

Author(s):Heyns, Terry L.
Description: 269 p.
Publication Data:Manhattan, KS : Kansas State University. 1989
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 20081301/ Accession No.: 47811
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. CERTIFICATION 2. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 3. KANSAS
Notes:A doctoral dissertation.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

27536

The design of emergency management command center alternative exercise models

Author(s):Green, Walter G. ; Pacific Western University.
Description: 215 p.
Publication Data:Ann Arbor, MI : University Microfilms International. December 21, 1996
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 87746/ OCLC Record No.: 667613844
Type of Item: (DISSERTATION/THESIS) DISSERTATION/THESIS
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MANAGERS 2. EXERCISES 3. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 4. TRAINING PROGRAMS
Notes:A dissertation submitted to the faculty in candidacy for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Emergency Management.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]