U.S. Fire Administration Library Citation(s)

 

McDonald's restaurant fire [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 11 (11) 1 digital video disk, 57:16 minutes
Publication Data: 2013
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. DEEPWATER, NJ 2. RESTAURANTS 3. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM 4. INTERIOR FIREFIGHTING 5. CEILINGS 6. WATER SUPPLIES 7. WATER PRESSURE 8. FIREFIGHTER INJURIES 9. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 10. REHABILITATION 11. ROOF COLLAPSE 12. LESSONS LEARNED 13. RADIO COMMUNICATIONS
Series Data:Fireline
Notes:Approximate length 8:10 minutes; Jeffery Hoffman, Chief, Deepwater, NJ Fire Company; Mike Miller, Deputy Chief, Deepwater, NJ Fire Company
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

Cranston (RI) house fire [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 11 (11) 1 digital video disk, 57:16 minutes
Publication Data: 2013
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. CRANSTON, RI 2. RESIDENTIAL FIRES 3. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 4. SIZE UP 5. SEARCH OPERATIONS 6. ANIMALS 7. STAGING 8. WIRES 9. WATER SUPPLIES 10. HOSE LAYS 11. INTERIOR FIREFIGHTING 12. SIDING 13. FLAMMABLE MATERIALS 14. SELF CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS 15. TOXIC GASES 16. OVERHAUL 17. NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 18. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 19. COLD 20. FALLS
Series Data:Fireline
Notes:Approximate length 8:40 minutes; Balloon construction; Dennis Moore, Lieutenant, Cranston (RI) Fire Department; Jeffery Wall, Deputy Chief, Cranston (RI) Fire Department
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

Fatal vehicle entrapment [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 11 (9) 1 digital video disk, 54:00 minutes
Publication Data: 2013
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS 2. MUTUAL AID 3. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 4. CRANES 5. CONSTRUCTION SITES 6. CRIBBING 7. RESCUE EQUIPMENT 8. NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 9. RADIO COMMUNICATIONS 10. RECOVERY 11. LESSONS LEARNED 12. REHABILITATION 13. HEAVY RESCUE OPERATIONS 14. NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DE
Series Data:Fireline
Notes:Kevin Cowperthwait, Deputy Chief, Christiana Fire Co., Newark, DE; Approximate length, 8:30 minutes
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 13 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 11 (9) 1 digital video disk, 54:00 minutes
Publication Data: 2013
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS 2. DRILLS 3. RESCUE OPERATIONS 4. RESCUE EQUIPMENT 5. TEAM BUILDING 6. SELF CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS 7. PACKAGING 8. TACTICS 9. EXTRICATION 10. PERSONAL ALERT SAFETY SYSTEMS 11. EVACUATION
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Frank Lipski, Instructor, Engine House Training, LLC; Approximate length 12:30 minutes; Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection Dist.; Modified Pittsburgh drill
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

47841

Completing the emergency operations center for the city of Wolfforth

Author(s):Addington, Christopher R. ; Wolfforth. Fire and EMS.
Description: 35 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. July 2013
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 143838/ OCLC Record No.: 884932655
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo47841.pdf (209.8 kb)
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTERS 2. RENOVATIONS 3. DISASTER RESPONSE 4. QUALITY CONTROL
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • Wolfforth Fire and EMS provides emergency medical and fire services for the City of Wolfforth. The Deputy Chief of Training has been appointed to serve as the Deputy Emergency Management Coordinator and has been assigned the responsibility to address completion of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) for the City of Wolfforth. The problem was: the City of Wolfforth never completed the EOC to meet the current demands for the coordination of emergency response following a large-scale incident or natural disaster. The purpose of this research was to develop recommendations to assist the City of Wolfforth in the completion and upgrading of the EOC to meet the needs of city staff now and into the future. This Applied Research Project (ARP) employed a descriptive research methodology. The procedures used to collect data for this project were multiple interviews and a questionnaire. The research questions used to guide this research were: (a) What are the current and future demands for the Wolfforth EOC? (b) What can be done to modify the existing EOC to make the space more user-friendly? (c) What is the current status of the EOC? and (d) What do the City of Wolfforth employees think about the EOC concept? The research results revealed that major changes and improvements to the EOC were necessary. Recommendations were made to correct and add to the existing space allocated for the EOC, including the addition of wired and wireless Internet access, addition of a radio area with VHF, UHF, 800 mhz and amateur radio capacity. Recommendations also included the addition of status boards or displays to provide situational awareness, the utilization of WebEOC for the tracking of incidents, the training of personnel with members from the nearby City of Lubbock, and the training and use of the EOC for planned and naturally occurring events.
Notes:Wolfforth, TX; Executive Analysis of Fire Service Operations in Emergency Management; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 12 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 11 (7) 1 digital video disk, 1:00:32 minutes
Publication Data: 2013
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 853262814
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS 2. TECHNIQUES 3. KNOTS 4. ROPES 5. RESCUE EQUIPMENT 6. TURNOUT GEAR 7. STANDARDS
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Frank Lipski, Instructor, Engine House Training, LLC; Approximate length 8:29 minutes; Drag rescue devices (DRD); Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection Dist.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

47533

Mentoring and succession planning for the Bedford, NH, Fire Department

Author(s):Klose, Mark E. ; Bedford. Fire Department.
Description: 50 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. April 2013
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 142923/ OCLC Record No.: 857244168
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo47533.pdf (425.03 kb)
Subjects:1. MENTORING 2. SUCCESSION PLANNING 3. FIRE OFFICERS 4. RETIREMENT 5. STANDARDS OF PRACTICE 6. BENCHMARKING
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem was that the Bedford Fire Department had not prepared for the possible retirement of three command staff officers (chief, deputy chief and captain) and two senior line officers within the next three years. Within the last eighteen months, line personnel and staff officers have recognized the need to have an official mentoring program as a component of a formal succession plan. This succession plan would assess the organization to be successful in promoting from within the department in the future. The purpose of this applied research project (ARP) is to identify the need for a mentoring program and succession plan as well as the necessary components which will help to prepare personnel for advancement within the organization. Utilizing a descriptive research method, the department was able to identify and address the problem through the following research questions: (a) What is a mentoring program/succession plan; (b) What are the basic components of an effective mentoring program/succession plan; (c) What mentoring programs/succession plans are currently being used by New Hampshire fire departments; (d) What mentoring programs/succession plans are currently being used by fire departments around the United States; and What are the benefits to the department for having a mentoring program and succession plan? The procedures utilized in the research included a review of literature, applied research projects, journal articles, internet websites, survey instrument, and personal interviews. The results indicated that a formal mentoring program is an essential component of an individual's career growth. Including a mentoring program within a formal succession plan can have a positive impact on the organization. The results also established the necessary components for a successful succession plan.
Notes:Bedford, NH; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

47449

Why are the sirens sounding in Wolfforth?

Author(s):Addington, Christopher R. ; Wolfforth. Fire and EMS.
Description: 46 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. March 2013
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 142796/ OCLC Record No.: 857244158
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo47449.pdf (389.8 kb)
Subjects:1. STORMS 2. WARNING SYSTEMS 3. SIRENS 4. ENGINEERING 5. TEST PROCEDURES 6. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 7. CITIZENS 8. ACCOUNTABILITY 9. RADIOS 10. SOCIAL MEDIA 11. NOTIFICATION SYSTEMS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • Wolforth Fire and EMS provides emergency medical and fire services for the City of Wolfforth. The Deputy Chief of Training has been appointed to serve as the Deputy Emergency Management Coordinator and has the responsibility to address weather concerns for the City of Wolfforth. The problem was: the City of Wolfforth did not have a comprehensive public notification system for severe weather, thereby putting the citizenry at an increased risk during storm season. The purpose of this research was to establish a comprehensive public notification system. This ARP employed an action research method, including a literature review and interviews which were conducted to provide the needed information to answer the following research questions: (a) What are the activation protocols for severe weather notification and alerting; (b) What are the engineering and testing requirements of public notification; (c) What are the community expectations of emergency management regarding severe weather notification; (d) What is the knowledge, skill, and ability of the citizenry following notification; and (e) What notification methods are available? The research results revealed that major changes and corrections were necessary. Recommendations were made to correct and add to the siren warning system currently in place, to increase awareness and preparedness through education and participation, to increase the availability of weather radios through grant and program delivery, and to begin exploring other methods of communication including Nixle and social media.
Notes:Wolfforth, TX; Executive Analysis of Community Risk Reduction; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 10 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 11 (3) 1 digital video disk, 50:01 minutes
Publication Data: 2013
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 840855008
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS 2. DRILLS 3. HOSE LINES 4. COUPLINGS 5. SKILLS
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Instructor Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection District; Mark Garbet, Captain, Redings Mill (MO) Fire Dept.; Approximate length 6:56 minutes; Spaghetti drill
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 9 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 11 (1) 1 digital video disk, 55:04 minutes
Publication Data: 2012
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 840850090
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. DRILLS 2. DISTRESS CALLS 3. RADIO FREQUENCIES 4. STANDARD OPERATING GUIDELINES 5. INCIDENT COMMANDERS
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Instructor Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection District; Eli Maples, Senior Engineer, Carthage (MO) Fire Department; Approximate length 11:40 minutes; Obstacle course; L-location, U-unit, N-name, A-assignment and air supply, R-resources needed
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

Barbieri Lumber Mill fire [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 11 (1) 1 digital video disk, 55:04 minutes
Publication Data: 2012
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 840850088
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. LUMBER YARDS 2. GREAT BARRINGTON, MA 3. PREFIRE PLANNING 4. WATER SUPPLIES 5. MUTUAL AID 6. FIRE SPREAD 7. FIRE HAZARDS 8. EXPOSURES 9. EVACUATION 10. BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSIONS 11. AERIAL LADDERS 12. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM 13. PUBLIC UTILITIES 14. EXCAVATIONS 15. TACTICS 16. TRAINING
Series Data:Fireline
Notes:Great Barrington (MA) Fire Department: Ed McCormick, Deputy Chief/Incident Commander, Mike Ordyna, Fire Chief, Harry Jennings, Deputy Chief, Gary Oggiani, Deputy Chief; Approximate length 12:05 minutes
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

46887

Fire chief suffers heart attack while fighting a structure fire and dies - Mississippi

Author(s):Baldwin, Tommy N. and Hales, Thomas R.
Description: 12 p.
Publication Data:Cincinnati, OH : National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. July 2012
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 820009701/ Misc. No.: F2012-11/ Accession No.: 141586
Type of Item: (REPORT) REPORT

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.cdc.gov/niosh/fire/pdfs/face201211.pdf (587.5kb)
Subjects:1. STRUCTURES 2. FIREFIGHTING OPERATIONS 3. HEART ATTACK 4. FIRE CHIEFS 5. SELF CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS 6. FATALITIES 7. FIREFIGHTING OPERATIONS
Series Data:Death in the line of duty; Fatality assessment and control evaluation (FACE) investigation report. No. 2012-11
Summary/abstract:
  • On March 4, 2012, a 45-year-old male volunteer fire chief ("the Chief") was dispatched to a residential structure fire. At the scene, the Chief assisted in exterior fire suppression operations for about 30 minutes. Smoke exposure was intermittent, and the Chief did not wear self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). The Chief and a crew member suddenly began coughing, became nauseated, and vomited. They took a rest break to drink some water, but both remained nauseated and became dizzy. The on-scene deputy police chief transported both to the hospital's emergency department (ED), where the Chief began complaining of chest pain; an acute heart attack was diagnosed. Despite care in the ED for approximately 75 minutes, the Chief suffered a cardiac arrest and died. Neither the ED nor the medical examiner's office measured carboxyhemoglobin levels to assess carbon monoxide exposure or possible carbon monoxide poisoning. The other crew member was treated for heat illness and released with no complications. The death certificate, completed by the county medical examiner investigator, listed "myocardial infarction" as the cause of death. The autopsy report, completed by the state deputy chief medical examiner, listed "atherosclerotic and hypertensive heart disease" as the cause of death. Given the Chief's long history of underlying coronary heart disease, NIOSH investigators concluded that the physical stress of fire suppression activities triggered his heart attack and subsequent cardiac death.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 8 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 10 (11) 1 digital video disk, 52:42 minutes
Publication Data: 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 840847857
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. DRILLS 2. SELF CONTAINED BREATHING APPARATUS 3. AIR MANAGEMENT 4. PERSONAL ALERT SAFETY SYSTEMS
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Instructor Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection District; Approximate length 10:24 minutes; Air consumption drill
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 7 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 10 (9) 1 digital video disk, 50:43 minutes
Publication Data: 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 808753596
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS 2. DISTRESS CALLS 3. PROTOCOLS 4. INJURIES 5. RADIO COMMUNICATIONS 6. RADIO FREQUENCIES
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Instructor Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection District; LUNAR: location, unit, name, assignment, resources; Approximate length 11:06 minutes
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

46478

Assessing the performance evaluation program for officers within Beaumont Fire Rescue Services

Author(s):McNeel, Jeffrey L. ; Beaumont. Fire/Rescue Services.
Description: 64 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. March 2012
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 139999/ OCLC Record No.: 815571492
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo46478.pdf (10 mb)
Subjects:1. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION 2. FIRE OFFICERS 3. STANDARDS OF PRACTICE 4. BEST PRACTICES 5. EVALUATION
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem is Beaumont Fire Rescue Services (BFRS) does not have a policy, procedure or instrument to formally evaluate the performance of its officers. This lack of performance evaluation could have a potential adverse impact on the department's ability to fulfill its stated mission, vision and values. The purpose of the research is to develop a draft policy and related tools and/or resources for use within BFRS to conduct effective performance evaluations of the department's officers. (1) How do other fire department performance evaluation programs work? (2) What are the standards, or best practices for an officer performance evaluation program? (3) Are there any legal or contractual considerations when implementing an evaluation program? (4) Do any barriers exist, internal or external to the department that could hinder implementing the program? (5) What options for a performance evaluation program are most supported by BFRS management team? (6) And how will the desired program be placed into operation? The research procedures included a literature review of existing performance evaluation programs and applicable state statutes, collective bargaining agreements and city policies for any limitations on implementing a program. An e-mail was sent out to all BFRS chief officers giving examples of evaluation forms and seeking input on the program. Of the three of responding, two supported a shorter version of an evaluation form. Ten interviews were conducted asking the following questions: (1) interview question one, do you agree that performance evaluations are an important part of fulfilling our vision, meeting our goals and improving our overall services to our community and how do you define fulfilling our mission, meeting our goals and improving our overall service to the community; (2) interview question two, what concerns do you have with a performance evaluation program; (3) interview question three, what options do you suggest for those concerns; (4) interview question four, what features, processes or outcomes would you want from a performance evaluation program; and (5) interview question five, specifically considering our chief officers, what are the key areas (knowledge, skills or abilities) that should be evaluated? The results regarding concerns most frequently reported were the potential for bias, favoritism and subjectivity. The options to limit bias included clear, measurable criteria; mutually agreed upon goals, and training and oversight provided to the raters. The priorities for subject matter included in the evaluations were daily routines and administrative responsibilities, program and personal management, and incident management capability. Seven recommendations were made to remedy the problem of no current performance evaluation program. The first recommendation is to review, revise and approve the draft policy. The second recommendation is that the Asst. Fire Chief and the three Deputy Chiefs set mutually agreed upon goals for the first year. The third recommendation is that the program be initiated as a pilot program involving the Deputy Chiefs only. The fourth recommendation is to monitor the process quarterly. The fifth recommendation is that the Fire Chief supervise the first evaluations, and improvements be made in the system as needed. The sixth recommendation is that the second year of the evaluation program includes all chief officers, with oversight provided by the Assistant Chief. The seventh recommendation is that in the third year the program be extended to Captains and follow the same process as before. Initiating the evaluation process at the top first can provide an example of true leaders walking the walk, provide ongoing training to learn and improve the process, and can establish the needed direction for the department to fulfill its mission and live up to its vision and values.
Notes:Beaumont, TX; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 6 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 10 (7) 1 digital video disk, 58:45 minutes
Publication Data: 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 796093996/ OCLC Record No.: 825078699
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS 2. DISTRESS CALLS 3. DECISION MAKING 4. TRAINING 5. STANDARD OPERATING GUIDELINES 6. RISK EVALUATION 7. RESIDENTIAL FIRES 8. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE 9. LEADERSHIP
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Instructor Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection District; Approximate length 14:29 minutes
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 5 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 10 (5) 1 digital video disk, 58:18 minutes
Publication Data: 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 781600990
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS 2. DISTRESS CALLS 3. MOTIVATION 4. DECISION MAKING 5. STANDARDS 6. SELF IMAGE 7. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Instructor Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection District; Approximate length 13:06 minutes
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

Timber Farms fatal fire [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 10 (5) 1 digital video disk, 58:18 minutes
Publication Data: 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 781600764
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. RESIDENTIAL FIRES 2. DECISION MAKING 3. SEARCH OPERATIONS 4. PERSONNEL ACCOUNTABILITY 5. HEAT STRESS 6. FIRE FATALITIES 7. CRITICAL INCIDENT STRESS 8. COUNSELING 9. INVESTIGATIONS 10. ARSON 11. LESSONS LEARNED 12. CHRISTIANA, DE
Series Data:Fireline
Notes:Kevin Coperthwait, Deputy Chief, Christiana (DE) Fire Company; Williard Preston, Delaware State Fire Marshal; Approximate length 9:40 minutes
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 4 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 10 (3) 1 digital video disk, 1:04:10 minutes
Publication Data: 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 779606414
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. SIZE UP 2. TOOLS 3. RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS 4. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Instructor Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection District; Approximate length 13:06 minutes; Subdivisions
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

46063

A common incident command board for multi-agency use

Author(s):Newbold, William D. ; Redmond. Fire Department.
Description: 60 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. October 2011
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 138895/ OCLC Record No.: 781490613
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo46063.pdf (339.9 kb)
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. COMMAND POSTS 3. FIREGROUND COMMAND 4. MODELS 5. LEADERSHIP
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Redmond Fire Department (RFD) is one of four neighboring fire departments represented in a combined training group which provides personnel training ranging from entry level firefighting to incident command (IC) training. Currently there is not one common IC board used by these agencies, either in training or at incidents. The problem is RFD and its neighboring jurisdictions risk operating inefficiently at the command post and compromising fire ground safety when utilizing dissimilar incident command boards at multiagency incidents. The purpose of this research was to develop a common IC board that would be utilized by multiple agencies who respond together on emergency incidents. Action research was used to develop and implement a common IC board for multiagency use and to answer four research questions relating to: (a) positive features and drawbacks of each agency's IC board, (b) features and information common among all IC boards, (c) information needed that was not on any agency board, and (d) the willingness of the agencies to use one common IC board. Research procedures included meetings with incident commanders from each agency and the training staff, development of a questionnaire for the battalion chiefs (BC), and consultation with the departments' operations deputy chiefs. Literature review and personal interviews within and outside the fire service were conducted as well. Research results identified a need for a common IC board and what elements it should contain. The literature review and interviews also resulted in items to be included that currently were not being used. With this information, a common IC board was developed for multiagency use. It is the author's recommendation that each agency adopt the use of the common IC board through policy, and that training on the new IC board be provided to all BCs and command staff prior to its full implementation.
Notes:Redmond, WA; Executive Analysis of Fire Service Operations in Emergency Management; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 3 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 10 (1) 1 digital video disk, 58:10 minutes
Publication Data: 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 769151994
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 2. PREFIRE PLANNING 3. TRUSSES 4. HYDRANTS 5. SHOPPING CENTERS 6. RESTAURANTS 7. FACADES 8. SAFETY ZONES 9. RESIDENTIAL FIRES 10. FACTORIES 11. RISK EVALUATION 12. HAZARDS
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Instructor Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection District; Approximate length 11 minutes; Subdivisions
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

45804

Forsyth County's staffing response and its effects on injuries

Author(s):Wells, Kevin M. ; Forsyth County. Fire Department.
Description: 82 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. August 2011
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 138404/ OCLC Record No.: 773955523
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo45804.pdf (344.5 kb)
Subjects:1. STAFFING 2. DISASTER RESPONSE 3. STANDARD OPERATING GUIDELINES 4. DISPATCHING 5. LEAVE 6. AUTOMATIC AID 7. NEEDS ASSESSMENT
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem that was addressed in this Applied Research Project (APR) was that Forsyth County had not measured the risk factors of its staffing response to fire incidents and the relation to injuries that have occurred. The purpose of this research was to identify the risk factors for firefighters and the department with Forsyth County Fire Department's (FCFD) current staffing response. Descriptive research was used to answer the following questions: (a) What are the national standards for staffing response and how FCFD compared; (b) What are the state and local standards and how FCFD compared; (c) What was the staffing on incidents where injuries occurred; (d) What are the surrounding departments staffing responses; and (e) What are the risk factors FCFD personnel encounter on fire incidents? The procedures utilized were a questionnaire (Appendix H) that was sent to a member from surrounding departments and a survey (Appendix I) was sent to the suppression staff of FCFD. Interviews were conducted with the fire chief, a division chief, a deputy chief with the state academy, firefighters who were injured on FCFD scenes and firefighters from surrounding departments. This information was then calculated and outlined in multiple tables. The results demonstrated that FCFD did not meet the national standard on staffing response. This included incidents where injuries occurred. The results also demonstrated the absence of a FCFD Standard Operating Guidelines (SOG) on minimum staffing, while surrounding departments were meeting national standards. The recommendations were for FCFD to establish a guideline for staffing, change the dispatch protocol, reduce the number of days off taken by firefighters, move the truck companies, sign an automatic aid agreement with surrounding departments and initiate a posting plan for apparatus. A long-term goal was recommended to formally reinvestigate applying for The Staffing Adequate Fire and Emergency Response Grant.
Notes:Cumming, GA; Executive Analysis of Fire Service Operations in Emergency Management; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

HV 6432.7 .S645 2011

A decade of hope: stories of grief and endurance from 9/11 families and friends

Author(s):Smith, Dennis [edited by Smith, Deirdre].
Description: 380 p.
Publication Data:New York, NY : Penguin Group (USA) Inc. 2011
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 707969119/ ISBN: 978-0-670-02293-9/ LCCN: 2011023325/ Accession No.: 138027
Type of Item: (BOOK) BOOK
Subjects:1. WORLD TRADE CENTER 2001 2. GRIEF 3. FIRST RESPONDERS 4. FAMILIES 5. VICTIMS
Table of Contents :1. Dan Nigro, former Chief of Department, FDNY 2. Ray Kelly, Police Commissioner of New York City 3. David Prezant, Chief Medical Officer for the EMS of the FDNY 4. Jay Jonas, FDNY retired deputy chief 5. Ada Rosario Dolch, former New York City high school principal 6. Peter King, Chairman of the Homeland Security Committee in the U.S. House of Representatives 7. Lee Ielpi, FDNY retired firefighter 8. Brendan Ielpi, FDNY firefighter 9. Jim Smith, retired NYPD police officer 10. Dan D'Allara, businessman and musician 11. Zack Fletcher, FDNY firefighter 12. Ken Haskell, FDNY firefighter 13. Michael Burke, hotel executive in New York City 14. Talat Hamdani, New York City schoolteacher 15. Toni Ann Caroll, former paralegal 16. John Vigiano, retired FDNY captain 17. Debra Burlingame, attorney and 9/11 activist 18. George Siller, cofounder of the Steven Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation 19. Jay Winuk, public relations executive 20. Akiko Takahashi, team member of a New York City hedge fund 21. Ray Habib, real estate executive 22. Robert and Barbara Jackman and Erin Jackman, cofounders of the Brooke Jackman Foundation 23. Cameron and Ann MacRae, cofounders of the Cat MacRae Memorial Fund 24. Rudy Abad, founder of the Marie Rose Abad Village in Manila, the Philippines 25. Sally Regenhard, community activist 26. 9/11 tribute organizations mentioned in A Decade of Hope
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: CIRCULATION - BOOKS [Status: IN]
 
 

The Pentagon response: 2 perspectives: the incident commander & safety officer provide lessons learned from a career response [in "FIRE-RESCUE MAGAZINE"]

Author(s):Sendelbach, Timothy E.
Description: In "FIRE-RESCUE MAGAZINE". v. 29 (8) p. 100-101
Publication Data: August 2011
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 748795861
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.firefighternation.com/article/features-0/pentagon-response-2-perspectives
Subjects:1. PENTAGON ATTACK 2. INCIDENT COMMANDERS 3. LESSONS LEARNED 4. DISASTER RESPONSE
Notes:Interview with retired Fire Chief Ed Plaugher, incident commander on scene and Deputy Chief John Tippett, Maryland Task Force 1 safety officer
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

RIT/mayday training. Lesson 2 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 09 (11) 1 digital video disk, 1:01:42 minutes
Publication Data: 2009
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 748809353
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. PREFIRE PLANNING 3. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 4. TACTICS 5. STRATEGIES 6. RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS 7. STANDARD OPERATING GUIDELINES
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Instructor Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection District; Approximate length 11:22 minutes
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

Safety on the fireground [in "24-7 FIRE"]

Author(s):Favre, Greggory J. and Mason, Benjamin [edited by Massey, James].
Description: In "24-7 FIRE".
Publication Data: Third quarter 2011
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 748809360
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. FIREFIGHTER SAFETY 2. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE 3. SAFETY MEASURES 4. FIRE STATIONS 5. FIRE APPARATUS 6. PREFIRE PLANNING 7. PHYSICAL FITNESS 8. DRIVING 9. STAGING 10. SIZE UP
Series Data:Firefighter series
Notes:Approximate length 17:36 minutes; Accompanying course guide CD includes: instructor guide; quiz; training evolutions; article; Billy Goldfeder, Deputy Chief, Loveland-Symmes Fire Department, Cincinnati, OH
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

45532

Proper staffing levels for the Township of Lower Merion Fire Prevention Office

Author(s):McGarvey, Charles J. ; Lower Merion Township. Fire Department.
Description: 49 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. April 2011
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 137502/ OCLC Record No.: 743362076
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo45532.pdf (435.2 kb)
Subjects:1. STAFFING 2. FIRE PREVENTION 3. JOB DESCRIPTIONS 4. WORKLOAD
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • Prevention is one of the most important aspects of any large organization or company. In the fire service, the fire prevention office covers these activities. When most people think about the fire service they usually only think of suppression and fire prevention for many departments takes a back seat and usually is one of the first to be cut during challenging economic times. The problem addressed by this research paper is that the Lower Merion Township Fire Department fire prevention workload has continued to increase while staffing has remained the same and a comparison has not been conducted. In March of 2010, staffing was again decreased due to the retirement of its Deputy Chief, and a current decision by the Township Manager not to fill any vacant positions for budgetary reasons. The purpose of this research project was to determine the actual workload of the Lower Merion Fire Department and compare it to present fire prevention staffing levels, in order to develop and recommend a proper staffing model to proactively protect the community. The descriptive research method was used to conduct this project and consisted of a review of published materials, conducting questionnaires and surveys of other fire departments, performing internal surveys, as well as personal interviews. This was completed in an attempt to answer the following questions: a) What are the work requirements for fire prevention inspectors? b) What is the present fire prevention staff work level capability? c) What fire prevention workload will not be accomplished under present fire prevention staffing levels? The results of this research showed staffing as compared to the current workload is insufficient and the findings of this research will be used as a basis for requesting and justifying the need for additional fire prevention staffing in the Lower Merion Fire Department.
Notes:Ardmore, PA; Executive Analysis of Community Risk Reduction; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

45530

Deputy chief suffers sudden cardiac death during physical fitness training - Illinois

Author(s):Baldwin, Tommy N. and Hales, Thomas R.
Description: 12 p.
Publication Data:Cincinnati, OH : National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. March 2011
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 733604530/ Misc. No.: 2010-33/ Accession No.: 137447
Type of Item: (REPORT) REPORT

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.cdc.gov/niosh/fire/pdfs/face201033.pdf (474.5kb)
Subjects:1. PHYSICAL FITNESS 2. FIRE CHIEFS 3. HEART ATTACK 4. ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT 5. CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION 6. HEART DISEASES
Series Data:Death in the line of duty; Summary of a NIOSH fire fatality investigation. Report no. 2010-33
Summary/abstract:
  • On September 20, 2010, a 55-year-old male career Deputy Chief (DC) responded to a medical call and provided assistance. Later in the day, the DC exercised as part of the Fire Department (FD) fitness program. The DC was about 5 minutes into his exercise program when the duty crew was dispatched to a call in which the DC did not respond. Approximately 90 minutes later, the DC was found unresponsive lying alongside the Stairmaster®. Despite cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and advanced life support (ALS) at the fire station, in the ambulance, and in the hospital's emergency department (ED), the DC died. The death certificate and the autopsy listed "hypertrophic cardiomyopathy" as the cause of death with "arteriosclerotic coronary artery disease" as a contributing condition. Given the DC's severe underlying heart disease, NIOSH investigators concluded that moderately strenuous physical exertion during exercise probably triggered an arrhythmia causing his sudden cardiac death. NIOSH investigators offer the following recommendations to address general safety and health issues. It is unclear, however, if these recommended programs would have prevented the DC's death: (1) Ensure fire fighters are cleared for return to duty by a healthcare provider knowledgeable about the physical demands of fire fighting, the personal protective equipment used by fire fighters, and the various components of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1582; and (2) Ensure on-duty fire fighters exercise in pairs or within viewing/hearing distance of another crew member.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

45566

Succession planning for staff chiefs for the New York City Fire Department

Author(s):Bierster, Gregory ; New York City. Fire Department.
Description: 102 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. May 2011
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 137580/ OCLC Record No.: 743362068
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo45566.pdf (441.6 kb)
Subjects:1. SUCCESSION PLANNING 2. FIRE OFFICERS 3. ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Fire Department of New York (FDNY) faces a challenge that is a threat to the organization's stability. All twenty staff chiefs are eligible to retire today, leaving the department with no one to replace these key positions, which will result in loss of leadership, continuity and organizational stability. The problem is that the Fire Department of New York does not have a succession plan in place to replace these staff chief officers. The purpose of this research is to identify the issues of succession planning for the Fire Department of New York. The descriptive research method was used to answer the following questions: a) What is a succession plan? b) What are the components of a succession plan? c) How do other departments similar in size conduct succession planning? d) How could the Fire Department of New York benefit from having a succession plan for staff chief officers? The procedures used to complete this research included a literature review of books, periodicals, executive fire officer (EFO) reports, three surveys, two internal and one external, and interviews were conducted. The results of this study demonstrated that succession planning is not a priority within the fire service. The results do indicate that succession planning is necessary for leadership, continuity and organizational stability. Research also indicated that departments surveyed do/do not have a formal succession plan in place. The results also indicated/revealed a need for a succession plan for the staff chiefs to provide strategic continuity. The research project resulted in several recommendations for the development of a succession plan. The recommendations include the following: designate only deputy chiefs as division commanders who will accept promotion to staff, have a written document that describes the functions and duties of each staff position, implement a mentor program to rotate future staff chiefs through different bureaus, and rotate staff officers through leadership positions across the organization to gain the breadth of experience necessary for promotion to increasing levels of responsibility. This would also make the organization stronger and more resilient to change.
Notes:New York, NY; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

45442

Social networking for emergency management and public safety

Author(s):Lesperance, Ann M., Godinez, Melanie A., and Olson, Jarrod R. ; Department of Energy; Department of Defense. Defense Threat Reduction Agency; Department of Homeland Security. Science and Technology Directorate.
Description: 90 p.
Publication Data:Richland, WA : Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. August 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 729629856/ Title Number: PNNL-19601/ Misc. No.: DE-AC05-76RL01830/ Accession No.: 137278
Type of Item: (PROCEEDING) PROCEEDING

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/pnl/social_networking.pdf (7mb)
Subjects:1. SOCIAL MEDIA 2. NETWORKING 3. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 4. PUBLIC SAFETY 5. CONFERENCES
Summary/abstract:
  • On March 10, 2010 the workshop titled Social Networking for Emergency Management and Public Safety was held in Seattle, WA. The objective of this workshop was to showcase ways social media networking technologies can be used to support emergency management and public safety operations. The workshop highlighted the current state of social networking and where this dynamic engagement is heading, demonstrated some of the more commonly used technologies, highlighted case studies on how these tools have been used in a variety of jurisdictions and engaged the private sector on how these tools might serve as a conduit for two way communication between with the public sector to address regional recovery issues and decision making. The workshop was supported by the Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstration Project, a project looking at long-term recovery issues from a wide area anthrax attack which is supported by the U.S. Department of Defense and U.S. Department of Homeland Security. This report summarizes the information presented by the keynote speakers and panelists and lays out conclusions on where the tools are today and their potential role in emergency response planning and implementation now and in the future.
Table of Contents :1. Introduction 2. The Future Is Here: Technologies Being Used Today 3. A View from the Trenches: Private Sector and Critical Service Provider's Perspective 4. More than Tracking Santa: How NORAD and NORTHCOM Use Social Media 5. Tools to Use: Existing Models and Best Practices 6. Conclusions APPENDIX A: Agenda APPENDIX B: Presentations and Handouts B-1: Glen Woodbury, Director, Center for Homeland Defense and Security Naval Postgraduate School B-2: Lind Simonsen, Community Relations Coordinator, Pierce County Transit B-3: James Graybeal, Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications and Director of Public Affairs, NORAD and US Northern Command B-4: Laurie Van Leuven, Strategic Advisor and Manager, Seattle Public Utilities B-5: Leng Caloh, Convergence Editor and Joe Spurr, Web Developer, KPBS B-6: Sabra Schneider, Web Master, King County APPENDIX C: Biographies APPENDIX D: Invited Participants APPENDIX E: Acronyms
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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RIT/mayday training. Lesson 1 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 09 (9) 1 digital video disk, 48:50 minutes
Publication Data: 2009
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 732361116
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 2. PREFIRE PLANNING 3. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 4. FIRE BEHAVIOR 5. DISTRESS CALLS 6. RAPID INTERVENTION TEAMS
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Instructor was Jason Hoevelmann, Deputy Chief, Sullivan (MO) Fire Protection District; Approximate length 11 minutes
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

44993

Career fire fighter seriously injured from collapse of bowstring truss roof - California

Author(s):Tarley, Jay L.
Description: 24 p.
Publication Data:Cincinnati, OH : National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. December 1, 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 693610323/ Misc. No.: 2009-21/ Accession No.: 136282
Type of Item: (REPORT) REPORT

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.cdc.gov/niosh/fire/pdfs/face200921.pdf (508.1kb)
Subjects:1. ROOF COLLAPSE 2. TRUSSES 3. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 4. WAREHOUSES 5. HAZARD COMMUNICATION 6. FIREFIGHTER INJURIES 7. INCIDENT COMMANDERS 8. SAFETY OFFICERS
Series Data:Injury in the line of duty; Fatality assessment and control evaluation (FACE) investigation report. No. 2009-21
Summary/abstract:
  • On May 21, 2009, a 36-year-old male career fire fighter was seriously injured while operating in a non-designated collapse zone of a commercial structure when an overhang of a bowstring truss roof system collapsed and struck him. The first arriving company officer reported a working fire in a single story Type II warehouse. The officer looked under a steel roll-up door that was raised approximately three feet off of the ground and saw heavy fire towards the rear of the structure from floor to ceiling. Per department procedures, the first arriving companies went into a "Fast Attack" mode. Crews attempted but were unable to enter the structure because the steel roll-up door wasn't functioning and the man door was heavily secured. The department's Deputy Chief arrived on the scene 9 minutes after the initial crew and determined that the fire should be fought defensively; however, this command was not relayed over the radio or verified with all crews. A crew was operating a 2 ½-inch handline just outside the structure approximately 20 minutes after the first apparatus arrived when the overhang collapsed and trapped the nozzleman. Key contributing factors identified in this investigation include: scene management and risk analysis, a well-involved fire in a structure with hazardous construction features, and fire fighters operating within a potential collapse area. NIOSH investigators concluded that, to minimize the risk of similar occurrences, fire departments should: (1) ensure that they have consistent policies and training on an incident management system; (2) develop, implement and enforce written standard operating procedures (SOPs) that identify incident management training standards and requirements for members expected to serve in command roles; (3) ensure that the incident commander conducts an initial size-up and risk assessment of the incident scene before beginning fire fighting operations; (4) ensure that the first due company officer establishes a stationary command post, maintains the role of director of fireground operations, and does not become involved in firefighting efforts; (5) implement and enforce written standard operating procedures (SOPs) that define a defensive strategy; (6) ensure that policies are followed to establish and monitor a collapse zone when conditions indicate the potential for structural collapse; (7) train all fire fighting personnel on building construction and the risks and hazards related to structural collapse; and (8) conduct pre-incident planning inspections of buildings within their jurisdictions to facilitate development of safe fireground strategies and tactics.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

Introduction to the wildland urban interface [in "24-7 FIRE"]

Author(s):O'Nale, Dean [edited by Kesler, Jeff].
Description: In "24-7 FIRE".
Publication Data: Third quarter 2010
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 695673206
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. WILDLAND URBAN INTERFACE 2. TERMINOLOGY 3. PREFIRE PLANNING 4. FIREFIGHTER SAFETY 5. SITUATIONAL AWARENESS 6. FIRE BEHAVIOR 7. FIRE LOAD 8. RESOURCE ALLOCATION 9. TOOLS 10. SAFETY ZONES 11. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 12. PUBLIC EDUCATION
Series Data:Firefighter series
Notes:Approximate length 20 minutes; Accompanying Instructor Guide CD includes: course guide, articles, quiz, quiz key and train evolutions guide; Interview with Deputy Chief Mario Rueda, Los Angeles Fire Department, Los Angeles, CA; National Firewise Community Program
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

Positive pressure ventilation [in "24-7 Fire"]

Author(s):Crittenden, Beth [edited by Kesler, Jeff].
Description: In "24-7 Fire".
Publication Data: Fourth quarter 2009
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 666800502
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. POSITIVE PRESSURE VENTILATION 2. BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 3. FANS 4. SAFETY MEASURES 5. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM 6. AIR FLOWS
Series Data:Firefighter
Notes:Approximate length 11:27 minutes; Accompanying Course Guide CD includes: course guide, training evolutions guide, quiz, quiz answer key, article and discussion points; Interview with Deputy Chief Stephen Kalman, Hackensack Fire Department, Hackensack, NJ; Inaugural edition
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

44333

The Virginia Beach Fire Department Chief's Aide: administrative guideline

Author(s):Hutcheson, David W. ; Virginia Beach. Fire Department.
Description: 52 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. January 2010
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 134674/ OCLC Record No.: 703937611
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo44333.pdf (673.5 kb)
Subjects:1. FIRE DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL 2. JOB DESCRIPTIONS 3. QUALIFICATIONS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Virginia Beach Fire Department has a newly created position in the department. The position is the Fire Chief's Aide. The problem is the Virginia Beach Fire Department does not have an administrative guideline for the position of Chief's Aide. The purpose of this study is to develop an administrative guideline for the Chief's Aide position in the Virginia Beach Fire Department. The study will answer the following questions: a) What is the position description for the Chief's Aide position? b) What are the qualifications for the Chief's Aide position? c) What are the perceived duties of the position of Chief's Aide by the Fire Chief? d) What are the perceived duties of the position of Chief's Aide by the two Deputy Chief's? and e) What are the historical duties of the position of Chief's Aide? To accomplish the purpose of the study, the author used the action research method, which included interviews, surveys and literature reviews. The results of this applied research project will provide options and a clear direction for the position of aide to the fire chief in the Virginia Beach Fire Department. Recommendations include immediate implementation of several components identified in the research, a position description and an action plan (Hutcheson, 2009) to be implemented as deemed appropriate by the fire chief.
Notes:Virginia Beach, VA; Executive Development; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

44194

Hazard analysis and vulnerability assessment for the Philadelphia Center City Rail Tunnel

Author(s):Mulray, Vincent P. ; Philadelphia. Fire Department.
Description: 72 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. November 2009
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 134356/ OCLC Record No.: 667164669
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo44194.pdf (224.8 kb)
Subjects:1. TUNNELS 2. RAILROADS 3. HAZARD ANALYSIS 4. VULNERABILITY 5. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS 6. FIRE DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem is that the Philadelphia Fire Department has not analyzed a terrorist threat to the Center City Rail Tunnel. The purpose of this research is to analyze characteristics that would affect emergency operations at a center city rail incident that was caused by a terrorist event or man made disaster and identify strategies that could improve the performance of fire department operations. Descriptive research was used to answer the following questions: (a) What is the experience of other communities? (b) What is the risk to Center City Philadelphia? (c) What characteristics would help or hinder fire department operations? and (d) What recommendations could be made to improve fire department operations? Literature review, personal observation and interviews were conducted, with the results being to recommend that the current operational procedure for railroads be updated. Preplans of all railroad facilities are conducted by the fire department. That training is enhanced to include familiarization of the characteristics of a railroad, along with awareness of suicide bombing incidents. On duty field Fire Battalion Chiefs and Deputy Chiefs to be part of the Alert Philadelphia Emergency Communications Network or similar system in order to have real time, up to date information of emergencies in their areas of responsibility.
Notes:Philadelphia, PA; Executive Analysis of Fire Service Operations in Emergency Management; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

New Deputy Chiefs Command Course [in "WNYF"]

Author(s):Butler, Kevin and DiDomenico, James.
Description: In "WNYF". v. -- (3) p. 11
Publication Data: 2009
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 667666920
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. OFFICER DEVELOPMENT 2. FIRE OFFICERS 3. NEW YORK, NY 4. HISTORY
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

A conversation with James E. Hubbard, Deputy Chief of State and Private Forestry [in "FIRE MANAGEMENT TODAY"]

Author(s):Brooks, Maureen.
Description: In "FIRE MANAGEMENT TODAY". v. 69 (1) p. 13-14
Publication Data: Winter 2009
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 611471213
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.fs.fed.us/fire/fmt/fmt_pdfs/FMT69-1.pdf (1.9 mb)
Subjects:1. COLORADO 2. WILDLAND MANAGEMENT 3. PUBLIC EDUCATION 4. WILDLAND FIRE SUPPRESSION 5. APPROPRIATIONS
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • : JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

43117

Nine fire fighters from a combination department injured in an explosion at a restaurant fire - Colorado

Author(s):Bowyer, Matt and Wertman, Stacey.
Description: 26 p.
Publication Data:Cincinnati, OH : National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. April 19, 2009
Identifier/s:Misc. No.: F2008-03/ Accession No.: 131739/ OCLC Record No.: 680243226
Type of Item: (REPORT) REPORT

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.cdc.gov/niosh/fire/pdfs/face200803.pdf (676.7kb)
Subjects:1. COMBINATION FIRE DEPARTMENTS 2. RESTAURANTS 3. VENTILATION 4. SMOKE 5. EXPLOSIONS 6. FIREFIGHTER INJURIES
Series Data:Injury in the line of duty; Fatality assessment and control evaluation (FACE) investigation report. No. F2008-03
Summary/abstract:
  • On February 22, 2008, a deputy chief and eight fire fighters were injured during an explosion at a restaurant fire in Colorado. At 1340 hours, dispatch reported visible smoke and flames through the roof of a commercial structure. At 1344 hours, police arrived and began evacuating the restaurant and the adjoining retail store. The restaurant was part of a block-long row of adjoining structures. Over the next 25 minutes, 3 engines, 2 ladder trucks, and 24 fire department members arrived on scene including the injured fire fighters. A crew entered the restaurant with moderate smoke showing toward the rear and no flames visible. The crew backed out and entered the retail store (an adjacent building attached to the restaurant) to check for fire in the ceiling but found only light smoke visible. Another crew attempted to ventilate the retail store with a chainsaw, and when the roof was noticed to be spongy, they moved to the roof of the next building, two buildings down from the restaurant. Interior crews operating in all three buildings had backed out. A crew closed the front doors of the restaurant fearing the oxygen would feed the increasingly greenish-black smoke pushing out of the roof of the restaurant. Fireground personnel noticed the front windows of the restaurant and adjoining retail store were vibrating as flames from the roof of the restaurant intensified. At 1427 hours, the restaurant and two adjoining buildings exploded sending glass, bricks, and wood debris into the street. The crew on the roof located two buildings down from the restaurant, felt the front portion of the flat roof heave up about five feet, sending a fire officer to the ground below and temporarily trapping four other fire fighters; all incurred injuries. In addition, four fire fighters, positioned on the ground within 6 feet of the store fronts, were injured by flying debris. Key contributing factors identified in this investigation included fire growth and smoke buildup in the common attic area of the buildings which pressurized and exploded, unrecognized building characteristics that contributed to the fire and explosion hazards, ineffective ventilation, execution of offensive operation SOPs and inadequate staffing.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

42044

Transition of power: succession planning at the chief officer level

Author(s):Field, Philip H. ; Centerville-Osterville Marstons Mills. Fire Rescue and Emergency Services.
Description: 50 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. April 2008
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 129267/ OCLC Record No.: 472526658
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo42044.pdf (400.6 kb)
Subjects:1. SUCCESSION PLANNING 2. FIRE CHIEFS 3. FIRE OFFICERS 4. CHANGE
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem was that the COMM Fire Department will potentially loose both its Chief and Deputy Chief over the next few years and no succession plan is in place to insure the continuity of purpose or preserve the combined 70 years of knowledge and experience they possess. The purpose of this research was to seek out any written guidance that existed at the national, state, or local levels in either the private or public sectors. Descriptive methods were used to search the trade journals, management publications, libraries and book store for data relating to succession planning. A questionnaire was distributed to over 100 fire service organizations asking what methods they used if any to insure adequate succession planning within their own organizations. Several texts from the private sector on succession planning and continuity planning were reviewed for usable data. The research made it clear that succession planning must be an ever evolving plan that begins at the lower ranks and continues to the executive level of the organization. Based on these results a carefully thought out plan building on the existing certification and educational requirements but also to include job shadowing and mentoring is recommended.
Notes:Centerville, MA; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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A deputy chief's view: line chiefs must foster & develop trusting relationships [in "FIREHOUSE"]

Author(s):Dahms, John G., Mueller, Richard A., and Peterson, David F.
Description: In "FIREHOUSE". v. 33 (7) p. 112+
Publication Data: July 2008
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 549884092
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. COMPANY OFFICERS 2. LEADERSHIP 3. CAREER DEVELOPMENT 4. MOTIVATION
Series Data:The fire service food chain: leading from the middle. Part 2
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

41449

Has the James City County Fire Department prepared their future leaders?

Author(s):Galganski, John F. ; James City County. Fire Department.
Description: 49 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. January 2008
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 127913/ OCLC Record No.: 472521111
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo41449.pdf (2.0 mb)
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE EDUCATION 2. CAREER DEVELOPMENT 3. PROMOTIONS 4. SKILLS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • James City County Fire Department does not have a career development program to prepare candidates for advancement into future officer positions. As a result, employees lack the desired leadership qualities necessary for successful careers as fire service officers. The purpose of this applied research project is to identify options which will assist in developing officer candidates for future vacancies in the James City County Fire Department. The research methodology is descriptive research. The research questions are: 1. What are the current promotional requirements for the position of Lieutenant, Captain, District Chief, Deputy Chief and Fire Chief within the James County Fire Department? 2. What are regional and national recommendations for certification and educational requirements for Lieutenant, Captain, District Chief, Deputy Chief and Fire Chief? 3. How do departments of similar size in our region prepare their officers for future advancement? 4. What skills do current officers in the James County Fire Department deem necessary to perform successfully at their level in the organization? The results of this research show that the James City County Fire Department lacks a formal officer development program. The certification requirements for Lieutenant, Captain and District Chief are consistent with those in the region; however, these positions fall short for having educational requirements. There are no published requirements for the Deputy Fire Chief and Fire Chief positions. After completing the literature review and surveys for this applied research project, this researcher has the following recommendations: 1. Obtain buy-in from the executive leadership and members of the department on the need for an Officer Development Program. 2. Develop a program based on the training, education, and experience recommended by the International Association of Fire Chiefs and Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education. 3. Revise current Standard Operating Procedures to reflect current practices and position titles. 4. Create job descriptions for the EMS Operations Captain, Fire Training Captain, Fire Marshal, EMS Division Chief, Lieutenants and Support Services Division Chief.
Notes:Williamsburg, VA; Executive Development; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

UG 320 .D3 2005 no.1.02

Cyber operations and cyber terrorism

Author(s):Army. Training and Doctrine Command.
Description: 46 p.
Publication Data:Fort Leavenworth, KS : The Command. August 15, 2005
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 62391409/ Accession No.: 126982
Type of Item: (BOOK) BOOK

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.fas.org/irp/threat/terrorism/sup2.pdf (924.2kb)
Subjects:1. TERRORISM 2. MILITARY DEFENSE 3. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS 4. COMPUTERS 5. TECHNOLOGY
Series Data:US Army TRADOC. DCSINT Handbook. No. 1.02
Summary/abstract:
  • This handbook is one in a series of supplements to TRADOC DCSINT Handbook No. 1, A Military Guide to Terrorism in the Twenty-First Century, which is a basic terrorism primer prepared under the direction of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence-Threats. The terrorist threat confronting our military spans foreign and domestic threats of nation-states, rogue states with international or transnational agent demonstrations, and actors with specific strategies, tactics, and targets. A major tactic used by many terrorist groups is Cyber Terrorism. Although Cyber Terrorism is covered in the capstone terrorism handbook, this supplement provides more detail and insight. This informational document supplements the basic terrorism handbook and supports operational missions, institutional training, and professional military education for U.S. military forces in the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). This document provides an introduction Cyber Terrorism, and addresses the history of the phenomena, how terrorist organizations recruit, the motivations behind use of the tactic, characteristics of Cyber Terrorism, and the types of attacks against networks. Finally, the handbook addresses specific threats to military forces.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

UG 320 .D3 2005 no.1.03

Suicide bombing in the COE

Author(s):Army. Training and Doctrine Command.
Description: 42 p.
Publication Data:Fort Leavenworth, KS : The Command. August 15, 2005
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 62391405/ Accession No.: 126981
Type of Item: (BOOK) BOOK

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.fas.org/irp/threat/terrorism/sup3.pdf (428kb)
Subjects:1. BOMBINGS 2. SUICIDE 3. TERRORISM
Series Data:US Army TRADOC. DCSINT Handbook. No. 1.03
Summary/abstract:
  • This handbook is one in a series of supplements to TRADOC DCSINT Handbook No 1, A Military Guide to Terrorism in the Twenty-First Century, which is a basic terrorism primer prepared under the direction of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence-Threats. The terrorist threat confronting our military spans foreign and domestic threats of nation-states, rogue states with international or transitional agent demonstrations, and actors with specific strategies, tactics, and targets. A major tactic used by many terrorist groups is the use of suicide attacks. Although suicide terrorism is covered in the capstone terrorism handbook, this supplement provides more detail and insight. This informational document supplements the basic terrorism handbook and supports operational missions, institutional training, and professional military education for U.S. military forces in the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). This document provides an introduction to suicide terrorism, and addresses the history of the phenomena, how terrorist organizations recruit potential suicide bombers, motivations for use of suicide, characteristics of suicide bombers, various weapons and TTPs used by suicide bombers, and finally, the specific threats to the military.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Large/Wide-area search. Part 2 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 07 (3)
Publication Data: 2007
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 665110184
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. URBAN SEARCH RESCUE 2. WAREHOUSES 3. RAPID INTERVENTION COMPANIES 4. RESCUE EQUIPMENT 5. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Disc contains DVD of journal and CD-ROM powerpoint training guide and .pdf training materials consisting of notes and quizzes. Printout included; Approximate length 22:00 minutes. Start counter 19:58; Steve Rinehart, Deputy Chief/Training Officer Maryland Heights (MO) F.P.D.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Wide-area search. Part 1 [in "WORKING FIRE"]

Description: In "WORKING FIRE". v. 07 (2)
Publication Data: 2007
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 665110155
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. SEARCH OPERATIONS 2. WAREHOUSES 3. ROPES 4. EXERCISES
Series Data:Hands-on
Notes:Disc contains DVD of journal and CD-ROM powerpoint training guide and .pdf training materials consisting of notes and quizzes. Printout included; Approximate length 12:00 minutes; Steve Rinehart, Deputy Chief/Training Officer Maryland Heights (MO) F.P.D.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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On top of change [in "FIRE PREVENTION - FIRE ENGINEERS JOURNAL"]

Author(s):Gilbey, Rupert.
Description: In "FIRE PREVENTION - FIRE ENGINEERS JOURNAL". p. 22-23
Publication Data: June 2007
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 611454115
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE 2. CHANGE 3. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE 4. DIVERSITY 5. GREAT BRITAIN
Notes:This issue combines Fire Prevention Issue 417 with Fire Engineers Journal Volume 67 No. 281; Interview with Deputy Chief Fire Officer Lucy Phillips, Hereford and Worcester Fire and Rescue Service
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Well-mannered [in "FIRE CHIEF"]

Description: In "FIRE CHIEF". v. 50 (3) p. 96
Publication Data: March 2006
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 549928829
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. COMBINATION FIRE DEPARTMENTS 2. PROFESSIONALISM 3. VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTERS 4. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 5. FIRE STATIONS
Series Data:Size-up
Notes:Interview with Deputy Chief Mike Jaffa, of the Bernalillo County (NM) Fire Department, regarding their firehouse etiquette class.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Reduced staff [in "FIRE CHIEF"]

Description: In "FIRE CHIEF". v. 50 (2) p. 128
Publication Data: February 2006
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 549923994
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. ATKOCAITIS, DAVID 2. FIREFIGHTER HEALTH 3. SURGERY 4. FIRE CHIEFS 5. PHYSICAL FITNESS
Series Data:Size-up
Notes:Interview with Deputy Chief David Atkocaitis, of the River Grove (IL) Fire Department, following his duodenal switch surgery for weight reduction
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Incident command perspectives [in "FIREHOUSE"]

Author(s):Eisner, Harvey.
Description: In "FIREHOUSE". v. 31 (2) p. 52-54
Publication Data: February 2006
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 549923849
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. HURRICANES 2. MUTUAL AID 3. DISASTER RESPONSE 4. FIRE DEPARTMENTS 5. HURRICANE KATRINA 6. NATURAL DISASTERS
Series Data:Katrina
Notes:Hurricane Katrina landfalls in Florida (August 25, 2005) and Louisiana (August 29, 2005) ; Interviews with Deputy Chiefs Richard Hampton and Tim McConnell of the New Orleans (LA) Fire Department
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Female deputy chief named [in "MINNESOTA FIRE CHIEF"]

Author(s):Gottfried, Mara H.
Description: In "MINNESOTA FIRE CHIEF". v. 41 (4) p. 25
Publication Data: March/April 2005
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 610013384
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. ST. PAUL, MN 2. FIRE OFFICERS 3. WOMEN 4. JACOBSON, SUE
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Integrated disaster response [in "CRISIS RESPONSE JOURNAL"]

Author(s):Hough, Emily.
Description: In "CRISIS RESPONSE JOURNAL". v. 1 (2) p. 34-36
Publication Data: 2005
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 667181091
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. NETHERLANDS 2. DISASTER RESPONSE 3. PUBLIC POLICY 4. REORGANIZATION
Series Data:Regionalisation
Notes:Interview with Elie van Strien, Director of Safety Policy and Operations, and Deputy Chief Fire Officer
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Nullifying civil service in New York [in "FIRE ENGINEERING"]

Author(s):Shepperd, Frederick.
Description: In "FIRE ENGINEERING". v. 100 (9) p. 643
Publication Data: September 1947
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 549903604
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. POLITICS 2. MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES 3. PROMOTIONS 4. NEW YORK, NY
Series Data:With the editor
Notes:On February 13-14, 1947, Chief Harold J. Burke, then a Deputy Chief, along with fifteen other candidates, took the two-day examination for the position of Chief of Department, FDNY. He topped the list by a comfortable margin. In addition, he had disabled veteran's preference. When it was known that Chief Burke had won out in the examination, a move was immediately initiated by the city administration to sidetrack him.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Smoky New York theatre fire [in "FIRE ENGINEERING"]

Description: In "FIRE ENGINEERING". v. 98 (1) p. 34
Publication Data: January 1945
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 549896474
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. THEATERS 2. NEW YORK, NY 3. COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 4. URBAN FIRES
Notes:Seven firemen, including a deputy chief, were treated for minor injuries of smoke inhalation during an early morning fire which damaged a theatre and seven stores, and threatened a large apartment house on Broadway near 88th street, New York City, December 11, 1944.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

36415

Current practice for structuring senior staff of California special district fire departments and organizational structure recommendations for the North County Fire Protection District

Author(s):Metcalf, William R. ; North County. Fire Protection District.
Description: 33 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. January 2004
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 113525/ OCLC Record No.: 476464429
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

This paper will not be made available on the Internet .
Subjects:1. FALLBROOK, CA 2. FIRE SERVICE MANAGEMENT 3. MANNING 4. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 5. ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The North County Fire Protection District (NCF) and its new Fire Chief had the opportunity to consider a reorganization of the department's senior staff organizational structure. The problem was that there was little or no readily available information about standard approaches for fire department senior staff organizational structures. To address the problem, this project set out to identify the current practice in fire department senior staff organizational structure and use the results to develop recommendations for NCF. The research questions used to guide the study were: 1) What is the current practice in California special district fire departments for organizing the senior staff? 2) Are there differences in organizational structure and size of the senior staff that can be attributed to differences in size, budget, number of personnel, number of stations, and/or number of calls? 3) How does the current NCF structure compare to the current practice in California? 4) What impacts might be expected if NCF implements the recommendations contained in this report? This is a descriptive research project. Answers to research questions were obtained by reviewing available literature, conducting a survey of California special district fire departments, analyzing the data in returned surveys, and developing recommendations for NCF. NCF differs from the current practice in senior staff organizational structure in that it lacks a clearly identified second-in-command, it lacks shift-work chief officers, and it has fewer total chiefs than comparable departments. Recommendations for NCF include filling the vacant deputy chief position, creating and filling shift-work chief positions, and adding additional chief officers to a total of 7 and reassigning administrative and operational workload to improve organizational effectiveness. Finally, NCF should develop and implement an evaluation process to assess the organizational structure on an ongoing basis and adjust periodically as necessary.
Notes:Fallbrook, CA; Leading Community Risk Reduction; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

35761

Is 360-feedback a useful tool for the Anchorage Fire Department?

Author(s):Strahan, Wade ; Anchorage. Fire Department.
Description: 94 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. September 2002
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 111491/ OCLC Record No.: 477232057
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo35761.pdf (389 kb)
Subjects:1. ANCHORAGE, AK 2. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION 3. SUPERVISORS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • A 1999 applied research project (ARP) by this author determined that the Anchorage Fire Department members were ready to participate in a 360-feedback assessment process. In the 1999 ARP, this author recommended that the Anchorage Fire Department implement a 360-feedback assessment process. The problem is that the Anchorage Fire Department does not have a formalized peer and subordinate evaluation program for supervisory personnel. The purpose of this applied research project was to implement and evaluate a 360-feedback assessment process in which the survey instrument was based upon a previous applied research project by this author that audited the organizational values of the membership. This project was conducted using an evaluative research methodology. The following research questions were proposed: 1. Are the survey criteria adequate to meet the needs of the members? 2. Could a 360-feedback assessment method provide a safe means to provide feedback to personnel of the Anchorage Fire Department? 3. Are the survey results of value to the members? 4. Could a 360-feedback assessment process benefit the Anchorage Fire Department? Research was conducted at the National Fire Academy with a literature review of current applied research projects. Local and electronic libraries were utilized to access current related information. Following a pilot 360-feedback project involving 11 battalion chiefs and one deputy chief, the 12 volunteers and their raters were surveyed to determine the adequacy and usefulness of the process. The results reflected that the survey criteria were appropriate, the evaluation method provided a sense of security for giving feedback, and the process was of value to the members and was beneficial to the Anchorage Fire Department. Recommendations included refining the criteria within the survey instrument, streamlining and shortening the process, providing training to all participants, and implementing a second pilot program before formal implementation.
Notes:Anchorage, AK; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

35429

Succession planning

Author(s):Anderson, Reginald E. ; Birmingham. Fire and Rescue Services.
Description: 37 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. April 2003
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 110638/ OCLC Record No.: 476911014
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo35429.pdf (116.2kb)
Subjects:1. BIRMINGHAM, AL 2. SUCCESSION PLANNING 3. SURVEYS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • Fire Departments across the nation face many dynamic challenges. One of the most important is the development of personnel to assume leadership positions within the organization. It is to this end the leadership gaps that exist in many fire service organizations must be addressed (Fleming, 2002). Current demographics show the baby boom generations are beginning to retire or will be eligible for early retirement, and with their departure they will take a tremendous amount of experience and leave vacancies in key top management positions. Organizations must be prepared for a mass flood of retirements as the largest group in the workforce approach the end of their careers. Currently within the Birmingham Fire and Rescue Service Department (BFRSD), 85% of the personnel have less than 20 years of service. The average number of years of service for the Fire Chiefs' administrative staff, which includes the Fire Chief, Deputy Chief and the Assistant Chiefs, is 23 years of service - ranging between 20-31 years of service. These numbers are indicative of the trend that show a younger, less experienced workforce. Without appropriate and adequate planning, a vacancy in a critical position can result in an organizational shakeup comparable to an earthquake and it can tear through the organization like a hurricane. Conversely, if a succession plan exists and employee development has been identified as a priority, a void in a critical leadership position will not last long (Vouglas, 1998). The problem was that the BFRSD did not have an aggressive, proactive plan to address the change in leadership in top management positions. The purpose of this research project is to identify current concepts of effective succession planning that may be institutionalized within the BFRSD. A literature review, the action research method and a survey, were used to answer the following questions: 1. What is the need for succession planning? 2. What are the critical components of an effective succession plan? 3. What are other fire service organizations doing to address the need for succession planning? The survey was mailed to approximately 100 urban, fully-paid fire departments throughout the United States. The fire departments had a minimum of 100 personnel and were selectd from a list randomly arranged utilizing the WordPerfect 9, Quattro Pro programs. Approximately 52 of the surveys were returned to the researcher. The research showed that an increase in discussions about succession planning has not inspired leaders to fully embrace the concept of succession planning. There has been expressed interest by some fire departments in successin planning, however, there is little found in the fire service. There are significant roadblocks that prevent implementation of succession planning (Bouth, 2001). There are key components that make up a succession plan including replacement planning, human resource audit, high-potential employee identification, employee input and development (Duncan, 2000). The researcher recommended that the BFRSD and other fire service organizations develop a succession planning committee. The planning committees' goal would be the development of a comprehensive succession plan that addresses the identification and development of potential candidates to fill future vacancies in key leadership positions. The committee should network with other fire departments and private corporations seeking all available information pertaining to succession plan development, implementation, problems, barriers, benefits and creative ideas on training programs. The succession plan must be tailored to meet the needs of the organization and should be developed with flexibility to accommodate future changes and requirements.
Notes:Birmingham, AL; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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A great job with great opportunities [in "FIRE"]

Author(s):Lynch, Andrew.
Description: In "FIRE". v. 96 (1173) p. 13-15
Publication Data: March 2003
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 610098667
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. AWARDS 2. DIVERSITY 3. FIRE SERVICE 4. GREAT BRITAIN 5. HUMANITARIANISM
Series Data:Equality
Notes:Interview with Deputy Chief Fire Officer Jagtar Singh, recipient of the Public Sector Excellence Award
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

34822

Funding alternatives for career fire departments - a non-profit perspective

Author(s):Barlow, Jeff ; Bloomington. Fire Department.
Description: 33 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. September 2002
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 108798/ OCLC Record No.: 477183727
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo34822.pdf (85.7 kb)
Subjects:1. ALTERNATIVE FUNDING 2. FIRE DEPARTMENTS 3. FOUNDATIONS 4. FUND RAISING
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem was the Bloomington Fire Department could not receive nor apply direct, public financial support toward its operation without complexity. The research purpose was to investigate creating a non-profit foundation to support the fire department. The research was descriptive, asking the questions: How was a non-profit foundation structured? What was involved in starting a non-profit foundation? Who should be selected as the leadership of the foundation? What would the foundation support in the Bloomington Fire Department? How would the foundation support relate to the city budget funding? The research used seven procedural steps, including review of current fire department allocation process and literature review. Additional procedures included researching state requirements, identifying incorporators, review of other non-profit boards to propose an appropriate fire department foundation board, and defining the purpose and municipal financing relationship for the foundation. Results indicated the foundation should form as the corporate structure. The fire chief and deputy chief, as the incorporators, should file articles of incorporation with the corporate name and other required information. The board of directors should have five community leaders with representation from business, education, the residential population, and the fire department. The foundation would focus its support primarily on large purchases or programs with long-term returns to the community and would be separate and distinct from municipal funding for the fire department. Recommendations included short-term and long-term activities that affected the fire department and potentially the entire fire service. Short-term recommendations were the fire chief and deputy chief were to be incorporators,drafting articles of incorporation and other necessary paperwork for submission to the secretary of state. Identified individuals should be contacted and asked to serve as board members. Long-term recommendations included selection of legal and financial expertise to guide the foundation in those important areas and publicly promote the foundation.
Notes:Bloomington, IN; Executive Development; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Improving high-rise command and control [in "FIREHOUSE"]

Description: In "FIREHOUSE". v. 27 (11) p. 24
Publication Data: November 2002
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 549692534
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. FIREGROUND COMMAND 2. HIGH RISE BUILDINGS 3. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM
Notes:Statement by FDNY Deputy Chief (ret.) Vincent Dunn on behalf of the Skyscraper Safety Committee, before the New York City Council, September 17, 2002
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

33562

Defining the leadership skills of tomorrow's fire service leaders

Author(s):Caton, Hugh R. ; Gresham. Fire & Emergency Services.
Description: 49 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. December 2001
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 106036/ OCLC Record No.: 477327552
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

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www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo33562.pdf (385.2 kb)
Subjects:1. FIRE SERVICE MANAGEMENT 2. LEADERSHIP
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem was that Gresham Fire & Emergency Services (GFES) had not identified the primary leadership attributes required of its executive positions. The purpose of this research was to create a list of the leadership attributes of the top executive chief officer positions. The evaluative and action research methods were used to answer the following research questions. What are the essential leadership behaviors that the union members expect of GFES executives? What are the essential leadership behaviors that managers expect of GFES executives? What does the literature say about the desirable leadership behaviors of fire service executives? A literature search was performed that focused on corporate and fire service material that contained descriptions of leadership attributes of fire chiefs or chief executive officers, and a simple comparative analysis of the literature was performed. To determine the leadership behaviors expected of GFES executives, a survey was administered to a sample of City of Gresham employees. It was found that the essential leadership attributes of the chief and deputy chief are the same. The final list of essential leadership attributes was developed by combining the results of the survey and literature review. They are general trustworthiness, friendly disposition, values and develops employees, general leadership, open communicator, team builder, aware of organizational culture, empowerment, ambition, strategic thinker, goal oriented, technically competent, thinks things through, interest in negotiation, and emotional stability. The researcher recommended that the list of essential leadership attributes be validated by the organization, validated against management's vision of executive leadership, and the establishment of leadership development programs.
Notes:Gresham, OR; Strategic Management of Change; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Deputy Chief Ray Downey and Lieutenant Andy Fredericks as we remember them [in "FIRE ENGINEERING"]

Author(s):Manning, William A.
Description: In "FIRE ENGINEERING". v. 155 (3) p. 68-71
Publication Data: March 2002
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 549682359
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. DOWNEY, RAYMOND MATTHEW 2. FIREFIGHTER MEMORIALS 3. FREDERICKS, ANDREW A.
Series Data:A tribute
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

33163

Facilitated mentoring: a step towards improving the leadership capabilities of the Birmingham Fire and Rescue Service

Author(s):Sorrell, Robert C. ; Birmingham. Fire and Rescue Service.
Description: 37 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. December 2001
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 105269/ OCLC Record No.: 477327517
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

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www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo33163.pdf (114.7 kb)
Subjects:1. CAREER DEVELOPMENT 2. FIRE SERVICE MANAGEMENT 3. MENTORS 4. SUCCESSION PLANNING
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem identified for this applied research project was that the Birmingham Fire and Rescue Service had very little formalized leadership training to prepare personnel for roles as the furture leaders of the department. The problem was compounded because due to changes in the pension system, 80 percent of the top 25 management positions (Battalion Chief, Assistant Chief and Deputy Chief) will be eligible for retirement within the next two years. The purpose of this project was to investigate the possibilities of improving the quality of the department's leadership training through the use of a facilitated mentoring program. The procedures used to gather data relative to this project consisted of a literature review and interviews with personnel who would have input into the feasibility of such a project. Reference materials were gathered from sources including the National Fire Academy's Learning Resource Center (LRC); the Birmingham Public Library; the Internet and commercially available reference materials. The materials were then organized into specific areas and materials not relevant to the project were discarded. Recommendations for a facilitated mentoring program were based on the information gathered during the research. The descriptive research method was used to determine: 1. Whether the mentoring processes currently being used by private industry could be used or adapted for use within the Birmingham Fire and Rescue Service. 2. How the components of facilitated mentoring would meet the needs of the officers in the Birmingham Fire and Rescue Service. 3. How the Birmingham Fire and Rescue Service would train its personnel to lead or conduct a facilitated mentoring program. 4. What the expected results of a facilitated mentoring program would be within the Birmingham Fire and Rescue Service. The research found that, although there were a number of facilitated mentoring programs being utilized within the private for-profit sector, there were few if any being utilized within the public not-for-profit sector. The recommendation arising from this research was that the Birmingham Fire and Rescue Service should develop a facilitated mentoring program for use by the department. However, a facilitated mentoring program should only be one part of a well-rounded management-training program. With the documented success of facilitated mentoring programs in the private for-profit sector, The Birmingham Fire and Rescue Service could use such a program to shorten the learning curve of its future leaders and increase their chances of becoming capable leaders. And by being such leaders, the department's continued progressiveness and stability will be assured.
Notes:Birmingham, AL; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

31985

Successful succession: will the next generation of senior staff officers build the organization?...or will they destroy it?

Author(s):Hoecherl, Robert F. ; City of Fort Lauderdale. Fire-Rescue Department.
Description: 54 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. March 2001
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 102563/ OCLC Record No.: 477243996
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo31985.pdf (146.9kb)
Subjects:1. FIRE OFFICERS 2. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE 3. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 4. ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS 5. SUCCESSION PLANNING
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem was that prior to this study the City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida Fire-Rescue Department (FLFRD) did not have a strategic comprehensive succession policy or plan to ensure continuity of transitional leadership of key positions within the organization. As a progressive fire service leader charged with fiduciary responsibilities of the position of a senior chief officer, one of your primary concerns is the growth, performancce, and success of your organization, and the professional development of its employees. It is no secret that the quality leadership that you and your colleagues provide everyday is the engine that drives continued growth. But a powerful engine is worthless without the parts to keep it running. Developing current talent for key management positions ensures the supply of competent future leaders your organization needs to continue successfully. Development of a comprehensive program that address leadership continuity is a fundamental and essential component of strategic planning for the years ahead. The challenge then to contemporary fire service executives is to create an organization that will inspire individuals to prepare themselves for several positions above their current rank (Aurnhammer, 1994). Will the next generation of senior staff officers build the organization? ... Or will they destroy it? This is the dilemma facing unprepared fire-rescue agencies across the nation. The purpose of this research was to provide information from which to develop a solution to the knowledge claims being questioned. Terminal purpose objective being the substantiation of credible and imperial data that supported the recommendations contained within this document as legitimate and genuine. Descriptive research methodology was used to answer the following questions: 1. What are the benefits of systematic succession planning? 2. What key fire department positions (ranks) would a succession plan be most beneficial for and why. 3. How do you identify future leaders and inspire them to prepare themselves for ranks above their current positions? The procedures used to complete this research consisted of a comprehensive literature review of the subject. The research analysis first examined previous applied research papers (ARP) relating to succession planning in the fire service. This literature review was then expanded to include local libraries referencing books, periodicals, and journals that supported or refuted the hypothesis in question. In addition, a thorough search of relating memorandums and archived records from both the City fire and personnel departments was completed. Finally, personal interviews were conducted with respondents responsible for policy making and holding key positions within the City of Fort Lauderdale, Florida Fire-Rescue Department. The results of this analysis supported the theory that a gap regarding leadership continuity existed at the top level of management, directly relating to the succession transition process for vacancies within the Fire-Rescue Department. The positions (ranks) identified were at the Battalion Chief, Division Chief and Deputy Chief levels. The discovery of related information, consequences of maintaining a reactive posture, versus a proactive approach, and the findings of this research report will be presented to the executive chief officers for review and consideration. The recommendations of this research project called for senior chief officers to review the ARP report. Dedicate the time necessary, and in an appropriate forum discuss the report findings. Afterward if consensus can be achieved among the senior staff members, implement a plan for the initiation of a strategic succession plan model. The paramount objective being a systematic plan to meet the human resource needs of the future. Hereafter, establishment of an effective succession program for leadership growth to keep pace with organizational growth and rate of attrition forecasts. "Let our advance worrying become advance thinking and planning: (Winston Churchill n. d.).
Notes:Fort Lauderdale, FL; Executive Development; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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About the brigades [in "FIRE"]

Author(s):Lynch, Andrew.
Description: In "FIRE". v. 93 (1148) p. 21
Publication Data: February 2001
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 610094309
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. CHANGE 2. FIRE SERVICE MANAGEMENT
Notes:Interview with Charlie Hendry, Deputy Chief Fire Officer, Kent, England
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

15000

Succession planning in the Libertyville Fire Department

Author(s):Zamor, Robert L. ; Libertyville. Fire Department.
Description: 36 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. December 2000
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 101598/ OCLC Record No.: 482301797
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

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www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo15000.pdf (234.2kb)
Subjects:1. FIRE CHIEFS 2. LEADERSHIP 3. LIBERTYVILLE, IL 4. SUCCESSION PLANNING
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • For the first 20 years that the Libertyville Fire Department was staffed by full-time personnel, it was obvious who would replace the village's first full-time fire chief. When the heir-apparent deputy chief was stricken with a heart attack and forced to take a disability pension, the remaining officers' career development and succession potential caused increasing competition and eventual discord. Five years later, when the chief did retire, one of the three internal candidates was successful in succeeding him, but the rancor and disappoinment that accompanied the process resulted in the two unsuccessful candidates' soon leaving the department. Now with the current chief considering retirement, there is a desire to avoid the previous tumult. Succession planning is a necessary prerequisite. The purpose of this research project was to evaluate the desirability ad plausibility of developing a succession plan. The research used both historic and evaluative methodologies, including survey research. Analysis of the literature concerning succession planning was also undertaken. The following research questions were considered: 1) What information can succession planning literature or research offer regarding the planning needed by the Libertyville Fire Department? 2. Do other area fire chiefs believe in and participate in succession planning; and, if so, to what extent? 3. Is succession planning the norm among area fire chiefs, or are there variables that make such planning more/less desirable? The procedures included an extensive literature review and the administration of a survey. The results found that succession planning was common despite the variability among the area departments and their chiefs. The study recommended the involvement of the village board and administration to develop leadership competencies; the involvement of the chief to disseminate the plan as well as for talent pool identification, development, and assessment; and a mentoring program throughout the process.
Notes:Libertyville, IL; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

29905

Diversity issues at the Washington Township Fire Department

Author(s):Anderson, Joseph M. ; Washington Township. Fire Department.
Description: 32 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. June 1999
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 95336/ OCLC Record No.: 482914140
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

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www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo29905.pdf (240kb)
Subjects:1. DIVERSITY 2. EMPLOYMENT CRITERIA 3. PROMOTIONS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem was a lack of diversity in the Washington Township Fire Department's workforce. The purpose of the research was to determine if the changes that the department made to the hiring and promotional processes beginning in 1992 had been effective, and to determine if methods existed to further improve upon those processes. The research methods utilized were historical and evaluative. Three research questions were answered in this study: 1) How does a diverse workforce assist the fire department in meeting its mission? 2) How successful have the changes in the hiring and promotion processes been in improving the diversity of the fire department's workforce? 3) What further changes can be implemented to improve upon the diversity of the fire department? The research procedure began with a literature review. United States census information was examined and departmental hiring and promotional records analyzed. An interview with the Deputy Chief responsible for overseeing hiring and promotions at Washington Township was conducted. The research indicated that a diverse workforce is critical for a fire department to meet its mission, as it affects the department's ability to communicate with the minority community, and to provide improved customer service. The project also found that the department's changes to the hiring and promotional processes had not been successful in increasing the diversity of the workforce. Strategies and methods for improving the department's performance in those areas were identified and recommendations made. The study concluded that the Washington Township Fire Department could better serve the community if its workforce was more diverse. Current methods for hiring and promoting firefighters were not increasing the diversity of the workforce. Additional strategies were available, that if implemented, would result in a more diverse work place.
Notes:Indianapolis, IN; Strategic Management of Change; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

29904

Examining the effectiveness of the current manning standards set by the Hinsdale Fire Department for ladder truck emergency response

Author(s):Kenny, Patrick J. ; Hinsdale. Fire Department.
Description: 43 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. June 1999
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 95337/ OCLC Record No.: 482913275
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

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www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo29904.pdf (125kb)
Subjects:1. LADDER COMPANIES 2. MANNING
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Hinsdale Fire Department is a full time department that consists of twenty-one full time members, one paid on call member, and covers a community of approximately eighteen thousand people. The department has been in existence for over one hundred years. During that time period, the department has witnessed a tremendous growth in the number of personnel, emergency calls, and types of service provided to the community. The growth has impacted the service provided by dictating the kind of equipment necessary to effectively deliver the different types of emergency care. Some examples are advanced life support ambulances, hazardous material engine, and a ladder truck response. This research project will center on one of these pieces of equipment, the ladder truck, and, specifically, the manning standards for emergency response of that vehicle. The Hinsdale Fire Department took delivery of their first ladder truck in 1979 as a result of changes in the makeup of the community. Over the previous twenty years, these changes included the construction of an eighteen story high rise, additional nursing home facilities, and other large life loss potential occupancies. The minimum ladder truck manning established in 1979 was one person. Additional members from the supplemental manpower (paid on call members) responded whenever possible. This could add as many as three additional personnel on the response. Mutual aid calls for the ladder truck were given a three person minimum response as agreed upon by the neighboring departments who signed the M.A.B.A.S. (Mutual Aid Box Alarm System) agreement. Over the years, the number of calls the ladder truck has responded on has increased from thirty-five in 1979 to three hundred fifty-five in 1998. Meanwhile the paid on call program has been drastically reduced and is being phased out through attrition. Manning issues affecting the ladder truck were addressed using automatic aid agreements, reassigning fire ground personnel or supplemented by available in station personnel. The problem facing the Hinsdale Fire Department is that the overall ladder truck response in the emergency operations of the department has grown almost ten times since its inception in 1979. The manning standard has not been adjusted during that same time period and its effectiveness is in question. The purpose of this research project is to examine the effectiveness of the manning standards set by the Hinsdale Fire Department for ladder truck emergency response. Two research questions will be examined to provide data in this area. The first question deals with whether the current manning standards on ladder truck emergency response for the Hinsdale Fire Department were effective. The second question examines what manning standards do other fire departments in the area use on ladder truck emergency response. Historical as well as descriptive research methods were used to gather this data. Surveys were mailed to the Chiefs of forty-five departments throughout the Chicago Metropolitan area. These surveys attempted to identify types of calls the ladder truck responded on, the manning standards, and if the Chiefs felt their manning standards were sufficient. Accident reports from the Hinsdale Fire Department Safety Review Committee, department log books and fire reports from 1979 to 1998 were examined to determine volume of response and any incidents involving the ladder truck where manning was documented as a contributing factor to the incident. Fire department periodicals, regulatory documents both on the federal and local level, along with applied research projects from the National Fire Academy, were reviewed on the topics of manning and specifically ladder truck manning standards. The most current M.A.B.A.S. agreement was reviewed to verify the minimum manning standard currently in effect for ladder truck responses from the Hinsdale Fire Department to other communities. The results indicated that the number of emergency responses the ladder truck responded on from 1979 to 1998 had grown almost ten times. The Safety Review Committee's reports indicated ten accidents involving the ladder truck in the same time period. In all instances, manning was not cited as a contributing factor. The most current M.A.B.A.S. agreement signed by the Hinsdale Fire Department in June of 1998 calls for a minimum of three personnel on all ladder truck responses. Twenty seven of forty five surveys were returned and their results indicated a consistent manning within each department as it applied to fire alarms or structure fires. The number responded concerning their minimum manning was not consistent between reporting departments. In only one study from the literature review was a one person ladder truck manning used. The survey of local departments had the minimum standard at two. The only agreement regarding miminum manning was departments would not drop more than one person below their normal manning to reach minimum manning. There was also no agreement between whether the Chief felt their department manning was sufficient. Some Chiefs who respond with two personnel felt that was sufficient while other Chiefs with the same manning felt it was not sufficient. The same was said regarding a three person response. It was only when the manning reached a minimum of four that all Chiefs agreed it was sufficient. The recommendations were threefold. The first was to continue the three person minimum manning standard for mutual aid response as that was consistent with our survey results and contractual agreement. The second recommendation was to continue the current methods to man ladder truck responses by supplementing the one person response with the Deputy Chief and automatic aid companies until an alternate plan for in town responses can be fully researched. The final recommendation was to begin the research as to the implications of adding an additional person to the ladder truck to bring the minimum manning to two personnel. This minimum would be consistent with a number of departments in our area. Factors such as budget concerns and personnel implications were to be considered.
Notes:Hinsdale, IL; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

29156

Developing leaders for the 21st century fire service

Author(s):Dettmer, Mike ; Kirkland. Fire Department.
Description: 47 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. 1999
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 93364/ OCLC Record No.: 482786423
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

This paper will not be made available on the Internet .
Subjects:1. EDUCATION 2. FIRE SERVICE MANAGEMENT 3. LEADERSHIP
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The purpose of this research project was to assist Kirkland Fire Department in the development of a long range plan to prepare its employees for future management positions through the use of higher education. The problem was that fire service leaders were not viewed in a positive light by city managers, mayors and the communities they served. Most city managers expressed that they felt their fire chiefs were not planning to meet future needs. Other municipal agencies employed personnel with greater educational status than the fire service. Higher education in the fire service was often given low priority. This made it increasingly difficult for the fire chief to compete with other private and municipal agencies for funds and programs. The research done for this project attempted to answer the following research questions: How do non-fire agencies and municipal leaders view fire service leadership? What are desired qualifications, expectations, and responsibilites of a fire service manager or leader? What types of programs, or components thereof, are currently available to assist fire departments in preparing their leaders for leadership and management positions? This project used the descriptive method of research. Information was obtained through a thorough literature review of articles in trade journals and fire magazines, NFPA National Fire Codes, supervision and management textbooks, personnel records, city policies, and a personal interview. The interview was conducted with Deputy Chief Rex Lindquist of Kirkland Fire Department. During the interview, questions were asked concerning responsibilities of his management position, desired qualifications and characteristics of a good fire service manager, and his feelings on education requirements for the fire service. His answers were very similar to the views of the authors of much of the reviewed literature. The results and recommendation of this research paper described a common concern that the lack of higher education for fire service managers is having a detrimental effect on the professional image of the fire service. The review of literature produced a list of responsibilites and desired qualifications and skills for fire managers. Most of the authors expressed that they believed fire service managers did not possess these skills. The author made recommendations for Kirlkand Fire Department to develop a long range plan to provide education to its employees that would prepare them for future management postions. It was recommened that a team approach be employed, allowing input from all members of the organization. Support from the organization was important. This support would include both shared financial support and formal recognition for those who successfully participated in the program. The author realized that even by beginning the planning process immediately, results would not fully be experienced for about five to ten years.
Notes:Kirkland, WA; Executive Planning; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

28913

The prerequisite training standard for promotion to fire lieutenant in the Tacoma Fire Department

Author(s):Lewis, Eileen F. ; City of Tacoma. Fire Department.
Description: 79 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. October 1998
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 92780/ OCLC Record No.: 482801879
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

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www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo28913.pdf (401kb)
Subjects:1. FIRE OFFICERS 2. FIRE SERVICE TRAINING 3. PROMOTIONS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Tacoma Fire Department was in the process of making the recommended changes which were identified in an independent study of the operation of the department by the TriData Corporation of Arlington, Virginia. This research project addressed the specific recommendations directed toward improving the current training plan of those firefighters aspiring to promote to fire lieutenant. This research was also an extension of the research and recommendations done by Deputy Chief Lewis in an applied research project, "Identifying the prerequisite training needs to be eligible for promotion to fire lieutenant in the Tacoma Fire Department." The research was historical research in the point of collecting data to determine the magnitude of change required from the current institutionalized requirements of a firefighter advancing to fire lieutenant within the department. The research was action research in that the information gathered through the historical research and ongoing discussions, decisions and planning of the Training Advancement and Promotional 2001 Teams established within the department was applied to the development of a department-wide plan to address the training needs of the firefighter aspiring to fire lieutenant in the Tacoma Fire Department. Specifically, this research attempted to answer the following questions: 1. What is the current perceived stress level of the members of the Tacoma Fire Department? 2. How did the Tacoma Fire Department firefighters and officers rate their immediate supervisors on selected management dimensions? 3. What optimal transitional plan would facilitate a training program to establish and implement a prerequisite standard for the firefighter seeking advancement to fire lieutenant within the culture of the Department? The recommendations of this study are as follows: 1. The City of Tacoma Fire Department should continue to follow the developed 1998-2000 Training Plan. 2. Incorporate Leader-Match Training & Stress Management into the current training plan. The order of class delivery should be to Officer Development followed by Officer Preparation. 3. Provide Dr. Beaton the means to conduct a follow up survey to evaluate the fire personnel's post-traumatic stress levels after conducting the Leader-Match Training & Stress Management Training. 4. Develop procedures to monitor the implementation of the 1998-2000 Training Plan. 5. Conduct additional research to determine the amount of training needed to provide the men and women of the Tacoma Fire Department with the knowledge and skills necessary to maintain optimal health and service delivery. The outcome of this research was a training plan which established and implemented a prerequisite standard of training requirements for the firefighter seeking advancement to fire lieutenant.
Notes:Tacoma, WA; Strategic Management of Change; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

TH 9157 .N33 no.2169 1991

Deputy chief fire marshal (uniformed)

Author(s):National Learning Corporation.
Description: 175 p.
Publication Data:Syosset, NY : The Corporation. 1991
Identifier/s:ISBN: 0-8373-2169-7/ Misc. No.: C-2169/ Accession No.: 91582/ OCLC Record No.: 667626069
Type of Item: (BOOK) BOOK
Subjects:1. EMPLOYMENT CRITERIA 2. FIRE MARSHALS 3. TESTS
Series Data:The Passbook series: passbooks for career opportunities. C-2169
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

25959

A recommended organizational structure for the Carol Stream Fire Protection District

Author(s):Bodane, Mark A. ; Carol Stream. Fire Protection District.
Description: 54 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. November 1997
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 89910/ OCLC Record No.: 488513815
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

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www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo25959.pdf (1.6mb)
Subjects:ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Carol Stream Fire Protection District maintained a common hierarchical structure found in most small to medium size departments. As the community had grown in residential and industrial properties, the Fire District added fire stations and additional personnel. The problem was that the organizational structure of the Fire District was nontraditional in design and lacked a second-in-command position. As a result, employees and elected officials had questioned the effectiveness of the organizational structure. The purpose of the research report was to recommend an organinzational structure that would best serve the needs of the Fire District. An evaluative research procedure was conducted to research the problem. Research questions to be answered were: 1. Why was the current organizational structure established for the Fire District? 2. What are the organizational structures of similar sized fire departments in the Chicago metropolitan area? 3. Is the private sector making organizational structure changes that are applicable to the Fire District? 4. Are there any National Standards applicable to the design of an organizational structure for a fire department? The procedures required the researcher to review available literature and reports on the subject, and to conduct a survey of fire departments in the Chicago metropolitan area. The findings indicted that the original structure was established to improve functional assignments and balance workload. The survey revealed that most similar sized fire departments have more chief officers and all have either a deputy or assistant chief position. The report recommended that the Fire District create the position of Deputy Chief. It also recommended that the current positions of fire captain be changed to battalion chief with the assignments of training, operations, and fire prevention. Finally, it recommended that the current daytime assignment for chief officers be maintained as a method to reduce the overall number of chief officers needed for the department.
Notes:Carol Stream, IL; Executive Planning; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

14561

Creating an organizational culture with the use of the officers' retreat program

Author(s):Weise, Robb M. ; Downers Grove. Fire Department.
Description: 31 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. 1995
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 83824/ OCLC Record No.: 502539295
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE 2. TEAM BUILDING
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • In an effort to create an organizational culture and develop team building, the Downers Grove Fire Department realized that changes were required. The organizational culture, recognize its strengths and weaknesses, and provide recommendations for team building and organization development. The overall purpose is to identify the importance of an organization to establish goals and objectives. During the course of this project, a combination of historical and descriptive methodologies were used to answer the following questions: 1. What are the strengths and weaknesses of the Downers Grove Fire Department? 2. Identify problem areas the department wishes to address. 3. Identify the actions developed by the management team. A questionnaire was developed and distributed among the officers, both line and staff, in an attempt to determine problems and solutions. This information provided Deputy Chief Paul Segalla and the author a benchmark to determine a beginning course of action. The research indicated that there was a lot of frustration and yet a great deal of desire to participate in the project. The recommendations derived from this research include (a) the fire department must recognize a need to change, (b) alternative management styles will have to be explored, and (c) time tables must be adhered to if credibility to change is desired.
Notes:Downers Grove, IL; Executive Development; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
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Call Number:

24529

Multi-jurisdictional operations: do we need a unified incident command system?

Author(s):Nash, Rick G. ; Bedford. Fire Department.
Description: 29 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. January 1994
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 78617/ OCLC Record No.: 502536286
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • A unified incident command system for the member cities of the Northeast Fire Training Association, Tarrant County, Texas, did not exist. The purpose of this research was to determine if such a system, which would be compatible to all member cities of the Northeast Fire Training Association during a multi-jurisdictional operations, is needed. The term multi-jurisdictional is defined as: more than one authority. This study used the evaluative research methodology. The research questions addressed were: 1. Is there a need for a unified incident command system for the Northeast Fire Training Association (NEFTA)? 2. Which system would best suit the needs of NEFTA? 3. What would the advantages and disadvantages of a unified incident command system for a multi-jurisdictional organization? Procedures included research of reports and studies of incident command systems and their effects during multi-jurisdictional incidents. Other literature researched included articles from fire service periodicals, fire codes and standards, and fire service texts. A survey was conducted with the members of the Northeast Fire Training Association (NEFTA), an organization of eleven cities that have mutual aid agreements. A personal communication was conducted with Gary Morris, deputy chief of the Phoenix Fire Department and president of the National Fire Service Incident Management System Consortiums. The findings indicated a definite need for a unified incident command system for multi-jurisdictional organizations. The information derived from the research material revealed many problems exist which impede progress during a multi-jurisdictional operation when responding agencies have different incident command systems. Basis for these problems was given as conflicting components of the incident command systems: terminology and specific details of organization structures. A continuing education and training program that supports the unified incident command system was found to be a contributing factor to the success of the intent and a smooth transition. Supporting findings indicated that even though many of the NEFTA members felt their system was compatible with their neighboring city, all but two of the members indicated a need for a unified command system for use during multi-jurisdictional operations. The recommendations were: to create a committee with a representative from each member department of NEFTA to determine a unified incident command system that is compatible to each member department during a multi- jurisdictional incident and one that can be used during daily operations; to develop a time line that would allow a smooth implementation transition; to develop a continuous education and training program that is consistent with the unified incident command system and the NEFTA goals; to have multi-jurisdictional training operations that would support the incident command system; to evaluate the system's effectiveness frequently and to stay abreast of new methods and technology that may necessitate change for improvement.
Notes:Bedford, TX; Strategic Analysis of Fire Department Operations; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
  • c.2: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

21584

Management communication program

Author(s):Rakestraw, M. Russell ; Prince William County. Department of Fire and Rescue.
Description: 18 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. September 1992
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 70106/ OCLC Record No.: 502532885
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. FIRE DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL 2. FIRE SERVICE MANAGEMENT 3. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION 4. SUPERVISORS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The purpose of the project reported on here was to develop and evaluate a method of enhancing communication between administrative and line personnel in the Department of Fire and Rescue while strengthening supervisory skills for first and second level supervisors. A system of information bulletins, authored by the deputy chief, was instituted for this purpose. The bulletins were based on current management issues within the department and were developed with input from the target users. The program was deemed to be successful. This success was indicated by numerous positive comments from the target audience, numerous suggestions for topics, and a request from an outside agency to be included in the distribution of the bulletins.
Notes:Executive Leadership; Prince William County, VA; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
Call Number:

18717

Developing an effective fire prevention bureau in a small fire department

Author(s):Tripp, William D. ; Westport. Fire Department.
Description: 12 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. October 1991
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 65473/ OCLC Record No.: 502529824
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. FIRE PREVENTION BUREAUS 2. WESTPORT, MA
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Town of Westport Fire Department is a combination department with 22 paid officers and firefighters and 20 call firefighters. The paid personnel presently consists of one Fire Chief, one Deputy Fire Chief, four Lieutenants and 16 Firefighters. Prior to 1983, there was no Deputy Chief and everyone but the Chief was assigned to a rotating shift which included operating the ambulance as well as performing firefighting duties. The demands placed upon the chief were extensive and were increasing almost daily. A detailed list of inspections and other activities which were not being done was compiled and the procedure to create the position of Deputy Chief was initiated. It had to be justified that this new position would benefit the community through increased Fire Prevention Activities. Since the creation of the Deputy Chief's position, the activities in Fire Prevention have continued to increase to the point where an additional position is needed to fulfill the needs of the community. Thus the process used to create the Deputy Chief's position must be reviewed and applied to the creation of another position which would be utilized almost exclusively for Fire Prevention Activities.
Notes:Westport, MA; Strategic Analysis of Fire Prevention Programs; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

17556

Establishment of a direction, vision, and culture for a field division of the Los Angeles County Fire Department

Author(s):Miller, Larry C. ; Los Angeles County. Fire Department.
Description: 28 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. May 1, 1991
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 63035/ OCLC Record No.: 502528827
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. LOS ANGELES, CA 2. MASTER PLANNING
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • As a newly promoted Assistant Fire Chief assigned to one of seven field divisions for the County of Los Angeles Fire Department, I was intentionally given very little guidance or history on what the duties of a field Assistant Chief shall include. Instead, I was given free rein by the Fire Chief and my direct supervisor, the Deputy Chief of Operations, to develop my own strategy on the operation of my Division. In developing this research project, the following steps were taken. A review of my own cultural biases; what goals were important and in what order; a review of the Division culture, its problems and strengths; and a review of the Contract Cities' opinions and expectations of the Fire Department. For the most part, the Division was handling the routine mission of fires and EMS emergencies with very few problems. It is my opinion that the organization had lost the pursuit of excellence and had slipped into somewhat of a self-serving atmosphere, with the customer being more of an inconvenience than the objective of our work. This was due for the most part to increased administrative demands on station personnel and management's loss of main mission prospective and vision. We generally were not investing much energy in preparation of the major incident nor were we taking advantage of routine emergencies to sharpen our skills. In discussion with all nine of my City Managers, I came away with the feeling that the Contract Cities were all basically satisfied with our performance; however, their opinion was somewhat vanilla in flavor, or not a problem, rather than the best investment that the City made. I also felt the cities were unaware of what the Los Angeles County Fire Department did for them or the resources that were available to them.
Notes:Los Angeles, CA; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

16933

Case study: the cumulative effect of multiple leadership types upon one fire department

Author(s):Hoyle, Keith E.
Description: 35 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. January 1991
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 61609/ OCLC Record No.: 502528234
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. CASE STUDIES 2. LEADERSHIP 3. MANAGEMENT
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • Since 1965, our Fire Department was led by a succession of three chief fire executive officers. Presently, we are approaching a crisis situation whereby the cumulative effect of the leadership styles of these individuals, in concert with a worsening economic climate, threatens the very foundation of our organization and it's service delivery capability. A confidential survey of Department members who served under all three Fire Chiefs was conducted to establish some baseline data for study. Further, building upon principles and theorems suggested by coursework in Strategic Analysis of Executive Leadership, I reviewed other literature that was more fire service leader-specific in order to gain more insight into the leadership styles of our chief executives. Then, I attempted to correlate this information with our Fire Department culture to see how leadership diminished or magnified problems created by the Fire Chief. Finally, I offered some suggestions to avert worsening of the Department condition and initiate positive change to improve the situation.
Notes:Deputy Chief Hoyle has purposely excluded his fire department's name due to the nature of this paper.; Strategic Analysis of Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

Harvard bound [in "FIRE CHIEF"]

Author(s):Dezelan, Louis A.
Description: In "FIRE CHIEF". v. 34 (11) p. 76-78
Publication Data: November 1990
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 549792525
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. HARVARD UNIVERSITY 2. MANAGEMENT 3. TRAINING PROGRAMS 4. ADULT EDUCATION
Notes:A deputy chief describes his experiences at Harvard University's program for senior executives in state and local government.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

25469

Flattening the organizational hierarchy of the Fairfax County, Virginia Fire and Rescue Department

Author(s):Brown, John J. ; Fairfax County. Fire & Rescue Department.
Description: 38 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. February 1995
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 81257/ OCLC Record No.: 502526563
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. FIRE DEPARTMENTS 2. REORGANIZATION
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Fairfax County (Virginia) Fire and Rescue Department maintains an organizational structure which includes a second-in-command position, four subordinate deputy chiefs, and four assistant chiefs at the senior management level. The purpose of this research was to evaluate if there is a need to streamline the organization by changing the upper rank structure and redefine senior management roles. The study conducted was an evaluative research project. The research was able to answer the following questions: 1. Do other fire departments have a similar organizational structure, and if so, how are they managed? 2. What are the benefits of retaining a second-in-command position in the fire department? 3. What organizational structure will best meet the needs of our customers? 4. Should the organization be restructured to facilitate more effective unity of command? Research was conducted using management and business trade magazine articles, text books, and personal interviews. The information collected provided the basis for the findings presented in this project. The findings indicate that organizations maintaining traditional hierarchies are inefficient bureaucracies that stifle individual initiative and inhibit progress. Flattening an organization and empowering employees encourages innovation and productivity. The retention of expensive multi-layered bureaucracies is a waste of taxpayers money which fosters, if not encourages, inefficient customer service.
Notes:Fairfax, VA; Executive Development; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

25350

Operation sea angel: a case study

Author(s):McCarthy, Paul A. ; Department of the Army.
Description: 45 p.
Publication Data:Santa Monica, CA : Rand Corporation. 1994
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 29478505/ ISBN: 0-8330-1492-7/ Misc. No.: MR-374-A/ LCCN: 93-42926/ Accession No.: 81008
Type of Item: (REPORT) REPORT

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.rand.org/pubs/monograph_reports/2007/MR374.pdf (1.7 mb)
Subjects:1. ARMY 2. BANGLADESH 3. CASE STUDIES 4. CYCLONES 5. DISASTER RELIEF 6. DISPLACED PERSONS 7. MILITARY OPERATIONS OTHER THAN WAR
Summary/abstract:
  • This report was prepared as part of a larger project entitled "Military Operations Other Than War" (MOOTW). The purpose of this project is to understand how worldwide demographic changes will affect future conflict (limited conventional and counterinsurgency), as well as noncombat missions (e.g., peacekeeping, civil affairs, humanitarian assistance, psychological operations, disaster relief). In addition, the MOOTW project examines a range of potential new Army deployments in the less-developed world. This report should be of interest to Army planners concerned with doctrine, training, and force issues pertaining to MOOTW. The first part of the project was completed in March 1993. Work in Task 1 included a study of the implications for the U. S. Army of changing demographic patterns in the less-developed world and a study of the demograhic pressures and political instability in the Middle East. The first study reviews worldwide demographic trends, focusing mainly on worldwide population growth, increasing urbanization, and displaced people, and discusses some preliminary implications for the U. S. Army. The latter study examines the implications of projected demographic changes on the stability of the Middle East, as well as the potential role of U. S. policy on the region. This report is one of several case studies that encompass Task 2 of the project. For this Task, researchers will catalog and assess the range of missions and requirements the U. S. Army is likely to face in the future. The project's final Task will utilize the general lessons learned from the case studies to identify changing U. S. Army requirements for training, force structure, and doctrine. The research presented here was sponsored by the Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and Plans, U. S. Army. It was carried out within the Strategy and Doctrine program of RAND's Arroyo Center.
Notes:U. S. Army - civic action
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

16199

Third party billing for fire and EMS response

Author(s):Gleason, Douglas R. ; Zachary. Fire Department.
Description: 13 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. 1990
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 58644/ OCLC Record No.: 502524607
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. ALTERNATIVE FUNDING 2. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The purpose of this applied research project was to ascertain whether or not Third Party Billing was a cost effective means of generating alternative revenue. This revenue would be for the purpose of establishing a capital out lay account specifically for vehicle replacement. It was obvious to me that this project was one of monumental importance to the fire service since so very little information existed on the topic. Information was gathered by a series of interviews conducted with executives of fire and emergency medical departments. This information was studied by my Deputy Chief, EMS Chief and myself. After the study period we met and discussed our findings. The findings of each individual were very similar in that Third Party Billing seemed to work for emergency medical calls but not for fire calls. The basic reason being the wording of the insurance policies that cover the two different types of emergencies. It was not recommended to Mayor and Council that Third Party Billing be implemented because the research did not reveal any economic gain with our present population and call volume.
Notes:Zachary, LA; Strategic Analysis of Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
  • c.2: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

25894

Elimination of the deputy fire chief position

Author(s):Corfield, Peter W. ; Niagara Falls. Fire Department.
Description: 46 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. August 1995
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 82386/ OCLC Record No.: 502519383
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. FIRE OFFICERS 2. ONTARIO, CANADA 3. REDUCTIONS IN FORCE
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem that initiated this research project was the elimination of the deputy fire chief position in fire departments throughout the Province of Ontario. The purpose was to find out the extent, and trend of the problem, if anything was being done to correct this situation, and if the fire service, in general, agreed with the elimination of the deputy fire chief position. The research method chosen was evaluative; including a survey of various fire departments and interviews of fire service professionals. Information from other studies and reports was also included in this study. The hypothesis was that the removal of the deputy chief position would negatively affect the local fire department, which would then negatively affect the fire service in the province, as well. The purpose of this research was to find answers to the questions: 1. Was anything being done to counteract this situation? 2. Is the trend continuing to eliminate deputies? 3. What effect will this have on the leadership of the fire service? 4. Is the elimination of deputy chief positions limited to fire departments under a certain size? The procedures were to survey fire departments of various size and location throughout the Province of Ontario. In conjunction with this survey, a series of interviews were conducted with various fire service professionals such as present and past fire chiefs, representatives of the Fire Marshal's Office, union officials, and other chief officers. Other surveys and reports were obtained that related to this subject, and are included in the findings of this paper. As well, various provincial acts and a municipal bylaw that pertained to this matter were also reviewed. The information was sorted and analyzed, and the results were tabulated and explained for this report. The results gathered for this study clearly show that the removal of the deputy chief position is not in the best interest of the fire service and, in fact, is contrary to the trend of maintaining or increasing management staff as shown in many departments, other studies, and the Province of Alberta. The future leaders of the fire service will have a difficult time honing their skills before elevation to the fire chief position with the removal of the deputy chief positions. Fortunately, there is opposition to this movement from the Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs. Also, findings of independent surveys have shown that the removal of the deputy chief position is not wise because fire departments in the province are already undermanaged. The recommendations of this study are to recognize the importance of the deputy chief position and stop its elimination, and lobby for changes to the Fire Departments Act, which would then allow for more officers out of the bargaining unit as managers. This would allow for the needed management team to be assembled so that fire departments can properly plan and operate an efficient fire department prepared to meet the future.
Notes:Ontario, Canada; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

16040

The incident command system: a manager's nightmare for a small rural department

Author(s):Clayton, William E. ; Stow. Fire Department.
Description: 14 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. August 1990
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 57433/ OCLC Record No.: 502519315
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. FIREGROUND COMMAND 2. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM 3. RURAL FIRE PROTECTION
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Stow Fire Department worked as a call department for many years. In 1988 it took its first step toward becoming a full time department by hiring 5 full time Firefighter/EMTs and a Deputy Chief. This was to cover the weekdays only as, coverage from the call force was not available during that time. Being a small rural department, we questioned the need for adopting such an elaborate system as the Incident Command System, and wondered whether it was really necessary. We also had to ask: "If it is necessary, how do we get involved, and will it help us?" As time went on it became apparent that we had to adopt an incident command system. We found that the federal government had developed laws and standards that required us to adopt a system; and by analyzing information taken from several articles, found that it would not be too difficult for our department to get involved. We worked the system on several of our calls (before, during, and after) to see how it would work and discovered how an incident could now be controlled instead of the incident controlling us. We soon recommended the adoption of an incident command system to the chief officers, arguing that this system would enhance the management structure of our department, and would benefit all members in the future by ensuring that everyone would talk the same language.
Notes:Stow, MA; Fire Executive Development.; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

15285

Evaluation of the strategic planning process in the Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety

Author(s):Headings, David ; Kalamazoo. Department of Public Safety.
Description: 41 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. May 1997
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 87901/ OCLC Record No.: 487901905
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. EVALUATION 2. PUBLIC SAFETY 3. STRATEGIC PLANNING
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Kalamazoo Department of Public Safety has recently gone through an administrative change with both the chief and deputy chief leaving within months of each other. The City Manager introduced a plan to reduce the cost of government without the loss of services. He instructed all departments to submit a plan to lower cost. The Department of Public Safety had to reduce costs by $1.2 million over a two-year period. The loss of revenue combined with a mission of continuing the service level created a unique challenge for the department to meet. The new chief had initiated a new process not used by the department before. It was strategic planning. Its purpose was for the department to be proactive and to shape its future and respond to opportunities, increasing effectiveness and efficiency while reducing cost. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the process and results of the department in developing a strategic plan. An evaluative research methodology employing a literature research and interviews of three department senior staff personnel was used to answer the following questions: 1. Has the department developed a strategic plan? 2. What model has the department followed to create a strategic plan? 3. Is a strategic plan necessary for this department? 4. Has the department used the right personnel for their project team? 5. Once planned, should the strategic plan be altered? The department used an outside consulting agency to assist in the process of developing a strategic plan. The author compared the process and results of the project to determine how effective the effort was. The expectations of the planning team and their method of formulating a strategic plan compared to other methodologies of strategic planning. It was determined that there were definite problems in development of a strategic plan and its implementation. The literature has produced several models to follow in completing a strategic plan. The model the department has used is not strategic; it is more of an organizational flow. The recommendation is for the department to educate itself as to just what a strategic plan is and how to develop one. There must be a more committed effort to complete the process of strategic planning. If the benefits of effecting change and exploiting opportunities are to be realized, a thorough understanding of strategic planning is essential.
Notes:Kalamazoo, MI; Executive Planning; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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Call Number:

UF 503 .W43

Weapon systems

Author(s):Army. Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Research, Development, and Acquisition.
Description: 1 v.
Publication Data:Washington, DC : The Office. n.d.
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 09100210/ Accession No.: 17639
Type of Item: (BOOK) BOOK
Subjects:WEAPONS
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
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  • c.1: CIRCULATION - BOOKS [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

VIDEO TH 9449 .L33 1988

Restaurant fire - Las Vegas, Nevada, September 10, 1988

Author(s):Doherty, Thomas ; Hamden. Fire Department.
Description: 1 videocassette, 10 min.
Publication Data:Hamden, CT : The Author. 1988
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 45666/ OCLC Record No.: 667597137
Type of Item: (VIDEO) VIDEO
Subjects:1. LAS VEGAS, NV 2. RESTAURANTS
Notes:No sound.; Videotaped by Deputy Chief Thomas Doherty of the Hamden Fire Department, Hamden, CT, who was on vacation when he discovered the fire. He reported the fire and then filmed the fire suppression scene that followed.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: MEDIA HALL - ROOM 216 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

13689

Stress, it goes beyond the emergency scene

Author(s):MacAllaster, Alan C. ; Orlando. Fire Department.
Description: 24 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. January 1989
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 47672/ OCLC Record No.: 502517273
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. JOB STRESS 2. PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The purpose of this study was to examine stress in the work environment. The method used to gather the necessary data was two questionnaires. Part 1 of the questionnaire addressed the causes of job related stress. Part 2 of the questionnaire dealt with the behavioral effects of stress. In part 1, the causes of job related stress, any item receiving a response of one third or more was considered an important cause of stress. While only 4 of the causes could be controlled by the employee, as many as 8 could be controlled or influenced by management. In part 2, the behavioral effects of stress, participants identified the frequency of various behaviors in both themselves and their co-workers. While participants identified their own behavioral effects, they sometimes could not identify the effects in their co-workers. This may indicate that firefighters tend to hide or mask their feelings. Findings in the Orlando study indicate that management was the cause of many of the job related stress factors. However, when the Orlando study was compared to other studies, including the Toledo study, the results indicated that fire service management as a whole may not be doing their best to reduce stress. During the time the Orlando study was conducted, the administration of the fire department changed. A new Chief and Deputy Chief were appointed. Therefore, it is recommended that the study be re-conducted in the future.
Notes:Orlando, FL; Fire Executive Development; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

Personal safety [in "PULSE"]

Author(s):Smith, Dave.
Description: In "PULSE".
Publication Data: March 1992
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 781600413
Type of Item: (VIDEO JOURNAL)
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS 2. LIFE SAFETY 3. PARAMEDICS
Notes:Trainer and police officer, Dave Smith, offers the EMT and paramedic advice about watching out for their own safety on the job. Not only are the do's and dont's discussed, but he also demonstrates how to subdue an attacker by applying pressure point tactics. He and EMS Deputy Chief Paul Maniscalco shows the safest way to approach a patient at night, when the dangers can be greater.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]