U.S. Fire Administration Library Citation(s)

 
Call Number:

46307

Paramedic engine companies: improving the EMS model for the city of Baytown

Author(s):Medrano, Victor ; Baytown. Fire Department.
Description: 37 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. February 2012
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 139506/ OCLC Record No.: 794343075
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo46307.pdf (110.3 kb)
Subjects:1. PARAMEDICS 2. ENGINE COMPANIES 3. ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT 4. EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS 5. BUDGETING 6. RESPONSE TIMES
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem is with the Baytown Health Department Emergency Medical Services (EMS) only having three Advanced Life Support (ALS) units in service, there are areas within the community that are not receiving an appropriate response time for ALS emergencies. The purpose of this research study was to describe the advantages and disadvantages of adding paramedic engine companies to the fire department's first responder program. The method applied to this research was descriptive and was utilized to answer the following questions: (a) What benefits will the community receive if the fire department ran paramedic engine responses; (b) How would a paramedic engine company impact the department's operating budget; (c) What are the advantages and disadvantages to the Baytown Fire Department (BFD) in hiring a certified paramedic over an EMT-Basic; (d) What improvements have other fire departments accomplished when they successfully integrated ALS into their organizations? The procedures utilized in preparing this descriptive research document consisted of a literature review, a questionnaire, Firehouse response data, and communication with the EMS Coordinator. The research has identified some advantages to the Baytown Fire Department implementing a paramedic engine company to its first responder program. The recommendation was that the Baytown Fire Department staff Engine 5 with paramedic firefighters to provide ALS service in a quick and efficient manner to the citizens that were underserved. The recommendation would benefit the citizens and guest of Baytown by providing a high level of service through the teamwork of the fire department's ALS First Responder Program and the Baytown EMS paramedics.
Notes:Baytown, TX; Executive Development; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

38813

Succession planning with the transfer of organizational knowledge for the EMS coordinator position at Meridian Township Fire Department

Author(s):Hammond, Greg ; Meridian Township. Fire Department.
Description: 49 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. March 2006
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 121089/ OCLC Record No.: 475880646
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.dhs.gov/pdf/efop/efo38813.pdf (158.9 kb)
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL PERSONNEL 2. SUCCESSION PLANNING
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem was that the Meridian Township Fire Department (MTFD) did not have a formal succession plan in pace with the transfer of organizational knowledge for the EMS Coordinator when this position became available. The purpose of this research was to determine the skill sets necessary to be an effective EMS Coordinator and develop a process to transfer organizational knowledge through succession planning with future EMS Coordinator candidates. This was an action research project. The research questions were: 1. What are fire departments doing nationally in regards to the transfer of organizational knowledge and succession planning? 2. What are mid-Michigan fire departments doing in regarding the transfer of organizational knowledge and succession planning? 3. What skill sets are needed to be an effective and qualified EMS Coordinator at Meridian Fire Department? 4. What processes should be implemented at MTFD to future EMS Coordinator candidates and prepare them with the necessary skill sets and create a successful succession plan for the EMS Coordinator position? The procedures involved literature review, personal interviews with 4 local fire department representatives that are located in the metro area and were similar in comparison to MTFD, an interview with a potential EMS Coordinator candidate and a sample 80 hour time study of the current EMS Coordinator. The results indicated that across the nation to locally, most fire departments do not have any formal succession plan in place. Although, the majority of local fire departments realize the benefit of having a succession plan, they did not establish criteria to create one nor did they have any future plans of doing so. First, based on this research, the recommendation was that MTFD develop a formal succession plan that would facilitate the transfer of organizational knowledge to future EMS Coordinators. Second, MTFD could improve methods of recruitment for potential candidates for the position of EMS Coordinator. Finally, the researcher recommended that the process should be reevaluated and if successful expand it to other administrative positions within the fire department.
Notes:Okemos, MI; Executive Leadership; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

HV 670 .G662 1984

Emergency health and medical management - a general guidance manual for local level emergency management coordinators

Author(s):Gordon, Paula.
Description: 200 p.
Publication Data:Washington, DC : The Author. 1984
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 53371485/ Accession No.: 112655
Type of Item: (BOOK) BOOK
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 2. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 3. MANUALS
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: CIRCULATION - BOOKS [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

30680

Advanced life support engine companies in the U. S. Marine Corps Base Quantico Fire and Emergency Services Division

Author(s):King, T. Kevin ; Washington DC. Fire Protection Programs, US Marine Corps.
Description: 68 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. October 1999
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 97003/ OCLC Record No.: 482912668
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

URLs are tested and verified at time of data entry.
www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo30680.pdf (725.7kb)
Subjects:1. ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT 2. ENGINE COMPANIES 3. FIRE DEPARTMENTS 4. MARINE CORPS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Marine Corps Base (MCB) at Quantico, VA received Advanced Life Support (ALS) emergency medical services from the surrounding counties of Prince William and Stafford, VA. There was no provision for ALS care by either the MCB Quantico Fire & Emergency Services Division or the U. S. Navy Medical Treatment Facility. Due to the on-going population growth at MCB Quantico and in the surrounding counties, the ALS response times exceeded recommended standards. Therefore, the problem prompting this research was the lack of on-base ALS emergency medical services for MCB Quantico. The purpose of this research was to determine the feasibility of operating ALS engine companies as a means to provide on-base ALS emergency medical services for MCB Quantico. Evaluative research methods were used to answer the following research questions: 1. Does the literature support ALS engine companies as an effective method of providing ALS care? 2. What is the experience of other U.S. military fire departments that have implemented ALS engine companies? 3. Will the fire and emergency services personnel at the MCB Quantico Fire and Emergency Services Division support ALS engine companies? 4. What are the costs associated with implementing ALS engine companies at the MCB Quantico? 5. Will the Command staff at MCB Quantico support an ALS engine company program? The literature review indicated that ALS engine companies were an effective method of delivering ALS care as long as the system was supported with an effective emergency medical transport system. Two survey instruments determined there were positive outcomes from other military fire departments that had implemented ALS engine companies and that the MCB Quantico Fire & Emergency Services Division supported the ALS engine company program. Interviews with the MCB Quantico Command staff also indicated support for an ALS engine company program so long as the funding requirements could be supported. The funding requirement was estimated at slightly less than $80,000 to establish two ALS engine companies. The research recommended starting the planning process for an ALS engine company program to include a funding plan and an objective analysis of factors affecting an ALS engine company program. Additional recommendations included further evaluation of the emergency medical transport proposal for MCB Quantico, providing ALS training for the existing MCB Quantico Fire & Emergency Services Division personnel, evaluating the initial ALS certification level, adding an EMS Coordinator position and follow-up with the 24 MCB Quantico Fire & Emergency Service Division personnel who did not participate in the survey.
Notes:Washington, DC; Advanced Leadership Issues in Emergency Medical Services; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on the Internet
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

30643

Supervision of emergency medical services

Author(s):Cody, William M. ; Los Angeles City. Fire Department.
Description: 29 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. October 1999
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 96913/ OCLC Record No.: 482801794
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

Sections of this paper not on the Internet.
www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo30643.pdf (274.8kb)
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 2. LOS ANGELES, CA 3. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 4. REORGANIZATION 5. SPAN OF CONTROL
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • This applied research project analyzed the management structure for the supervision of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in the Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD). The problem was that the personnel responsible for the supervision of EMS in the LAFD were not properly positioned in either the organizational structure or the chain of command to be able to directly affect the behavior of the line personnel providing the services. The purpose of the research was to develop recommendations for an EMS management structure that would improve supervision of all line personnel providing EMS. This research project employed the action research methodology to identify: 1. What rank and reporting structure would allow LAFD EMS District Officers to have direct supervisory authority over all line personnel providing EMS? 2. What was a reasonable span of control for LAFD EMS District Officers? 3. How did other like-sized and/or adjacent fire-based EMS providers that provide ambulance transportation supervise the line peronnel providing EMS? 4. What factors prevented the LAFD from implementing an EMS management structure similar to the ones employed by other like-sized and/or adjacent fire-based EMS providers that provided ambulance transportation? The principle procedures employed in this research project were: a review of the literature; survey; personal interviews; searches of related areas via the Internet; an analysis of federal, state, and local laws, regulations, policies, and standards; and an analysis of LAFD EMS performance data. The major findings of this research were that the current LAFD management structure does not adequately support EMS supervision. The primary reasons for this lack of support included: an inadequate number of EMS Districts; an excessive span of control for the current EMS District Officers; an inappropriate chain of command for the EMS District Officers; insufficient rank for the EMS District Officers; and inadequate representation of EMS issues at the general staff level due to the lack of an executive level EMS Officer. The recommendations resulting from this research were that the LAFD should: 1. Increase the number of EMS Districts to match those of the current Emergency Services Bureau Battalions; 2. Realign the EMS District boundaries to match those of the current Emergency Services Bureau Battalions; 3. Elevate the EMS District Officers to rank of Lieutenant Commander and assign them to the Bureau of Emergency Services as the Battalion EMS Officer reporting directly to the administrative Battalion Commander; 4. Establish an EMS Executive Officer assigned to the Bureau of Emergency Services at the level of Assistant Chief to function as the Department's Chief Paramedic and EMS Coordinator; and 5. Seek funding from the Mayor and City Council to implement the proposed recommendations.
Notes:Los Angeles, CA; Executive Development; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

CDROM T 55.3 .H3 C2811 ems

Decision making skills for public officials during a hazardous materials incident - EMS coordinator

Author(s):Federal Emergency Management Agency. Emergency Management Institute.
Description: 1 compact disk
Publication Data:Orlando, FL : Carley Corporation. n.d.
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 92880/ Accession No.: 110867/ OCLC Record No.: 781559470
Type of Item: (CDROM)
Subjects:1. DECISION MAKING 2. EMERGENCY MEDICAL PERSONNEL 3. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ACCIDENTS 4. SKILLS
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: MEDIA HALL - ROOM 216 [Status: IN]
  • c.2: MEDIA HALL - ROOM 216 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

28086

An evaluation of the EMS patient transport service for the City of Oviedo Fire Rescue Emergency Management

Author(s):White, Lars D. ; Oviedo. Fire Rescue Emergency Management.
Description: 115 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. February 1998
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 90493/ OCLC Record No.: 482912736
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER

PDF

Sections of this paper not on the Internet.
www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo28086.pdf (198kb)
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 2. EVALUATION 3. PATIENT TRANSFER
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The problem identified for research was that since the inception of an EMS patient transport service was secured by the City of Oviedo Fire Rescue Emergency Management approximately one year ago, no evaluation of the new service had yet been performed to determine the successes, failures, or areas for improvement. The purpose of this applied research project was to evaluate the EMS patient transport service since inception and to determine if the new service was in fact meeting the expectations of both the internal customer (employee), and the external customer (patient), as well as to compare the service to other local fire rescue agencies who were also providing an EMS patient transport service. The research sought answers to the following questions: 1. How did the internal customers (employee) rate the quality of the EMS patient transport service? 2. How did the external customers (patient) rate the quality of the EMS patient transport service? 3. How did the EMS Coordinators of local fire rescue agencies rate the EMS patient transport service? 4. How did the Medical Director rate the quality of the EMS patient transport service? 5. Was the revenue collected from the EMS patient transport service meeting our expectations? A descriptive research methodology was selected in order to evaluate data collected from several different sources. The internal customers (employee), external customers (patient), local fire/rescue EMS coordinators, and the medical director, were surveyed in an effort to evaluate the EMS transport service from different perspectives. Furthermore, financial data, and the citizen complaint process, were also evaluated. The research results indicated that the survey process was effective in determining the status of the EMS transport service and that the service was rated an overall "excellent" by the internal customers, external customers, as well as the medical director and EMS Coordinators. Furthermore, financial data evaluated determined that revenue collected was above the national average and exceeded the organization's expectations. The use of customer survey cards proved to be an effective tool in soliciting information from the customer and determining the level of satisfaction. Recommendations pursuant to this research project determined that surveys of the customer, employees, medical director, and EMS coordinators supported the theory that the City of Oviedo Fire Rescue Emergency Management was performing an "excellent" level of service with the EMS patient transport service and its results have assisted the staff in continuing to manage this field of customer service in a cost effective manner.
Notes:Oviedo, FL; Strategic Management of Change; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

26436

Evaluating the risk of injury and illness to the customers served by the City of Fremont Fire Department

Author(s):O'Brien, Robert J. ; Fremont. Fire Department.
Description: 50 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. October 1, 1995
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 83306/ OCLC Record No.: 502538499
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. INJURIES 2. PUBLIC SAFETY 3. RISK EVALUATION
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • On July 1, 1994, the City of Fremont entered into a contractual agreement with the City of Union City to provide fire protection and related emergency and non-emergency services. Since the City of Fremont started providing these services to Union City residents, Fremont Fire Department staff had not yet analyzed the emergency service activities delivered to its customers. The purpose of this research study was to identify who is conducting risk reduction education for health and safety issues in the Fremont Fire Department service area. It also evaluated current emergency response activity Fremont Fire Department engine companies are handling. The goal was to determine if current public education programs were satisfactory or should be improved. This study used historical and evaluative research methodology. The research questions to be answered were: 1. What public education programs are delivered by City of Fremont agencies and other community based organizations? 2. What are the leading emergency medical aid request for service incidents in Fremont and Union City? 3. What target audiences should the Fremont Fire Department focus its attention on in relation to risk reduction for health and safety issues? 4. What public education strategies should the Fremont Fire Department employ to reduce the risk factors associated with the leading EMS requests received? A literature review was conducted to examine and identify what City of Fremont departments and other health care organizations were doing to reduce unnecessary health and life safety risks to their citizens. An extensive data analysis of Fremont Fire Department emergency incidents was conducted to identify emergency medical service incidents in the Fremont Fire Department service area. The time period studied was between January 1, 1995, and July 1, 1995. A total of 3,737 patient care cases were analyzed. These incidents were broken down by medical incident type, patient severity, transportation response code to the hospital, and were listed by engine company. The data indicated that 86% of all patients treated did not have a life-threatening condition. Of the total number of patients treated, 14% sustained life-threatening health conditions. The data also identified the central portion of the City of Fremont had the majority of the emergency responses. Cardiac arrest survival was also reviewed in this study. Approximately 56% of all patients having an initial heart rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia upon arrival of the engine company regained vital signs prior to arriving at the hospital. Of these, 30% were released from the hospital with neurological status intact. The data further identified bystander cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) accompanied by a rapid engine company response as the common link to patient survival. Cardiac arrest survival rates were significantly high in the Fremont service area when measured with a national standard tool; however, more of these patients might survive if more citizens learned CPR. A summary of the data indicated there were four primary categories patients fall into. The leading emergency medical incidents were trauma at 34% of all incidents; medical aid request (encompassing a variety of health-related illnesses) were 44% of all incidents; cardiac-related illnesses were 12% of all incidents; respiratory illnesses were 10% of all incidents. A majority of the critical patients fell into the categories of cardiac and trauma. The recommendations stated the Fremont Fire Department should establish a Public Education Division. The person staffing this position should work with the department's Fire Marshal and EMS Coordinator to help identify trends in injuries and illnesses identified by data collected in incident reports. This staff employee would work with other government and private sector organizations to establish a Public Health and Safety coalition. The coalition would seek grant funding to finance public education in risk reduction strategies for the Tri-City areas of Fremont, Union City and Newark. A coalition whose primary focus is health related should be formed to avoid fragmentation of resources and waste of funds. Public education on health-related issues should be presented through a coordinated effort under one umbrella organization. Educational programs should be based on trends identified through data collection.
Notes:Fremont, CA; Strategic Analysis of Community Risk Reduction; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

An interview with District Chief Gary Davis, EMS coordinator, Oklahoma City Fire Department [in "SPEAKING OF FIRE"]

Author(s):Hall, Rich.
Description: In "SPEAKING OF FIRE". v. 2 (4) p. 17-19+
Publication Data: Winter 1995
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 610012818
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 2. EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE 3. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM 4. OKLAHOMA CITY BOMBING 5. PATIENT TRANSFER 6. TRIAGE
Notes:District Chief Davis coordinated the transfer of 204 patients during the Oklahoma City, OK, incident.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

TH 9504 .C2 ICS MC 222-9

Air ambulance coordinator (rev. ed.)

Author(s):California. Office of Emergency Services. Operations Coordination Center.
Description: 10 p. (rev. ed.).
Publication Data:Riverside, CA : The Center. March 1993
Identifier/s:Misc. No.: ICS-MC-222-9/ Accession No.: 74660/ OCLC Record No.: 667623872
Type of Item: (BOOK) BOOK
Subjects:1. AIR MEDICAL TRANSPORT 2. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 3. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM 4. JOB DESCRIPTIONS 5. MANUALS 6. NATIONAL INTERAGENCY INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
Series Data:Incident command system multi-casualty position manual
Availability:Not available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: REFERENCE [Status: NON-CIRCULATING]
 
 
Call Number:

TH 9504 .C2 ICS MC 222-8

Ground ambulance coordinator (rev. ed.)

Author(s):California. Office of Emergency Services. Operations Coordination Center.
Description: 7 p. (rev. ed.).
Publication Data:Riverside, CA : The Center. March 1993
Identifier/s:Misc. No.: ICS-MC-222-8/ Accession No.: 74659/ OCLC Record No.: 667623870
Type of Item: (BOOK) BOOK
Subjects:1. AMBULANCES 2. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 3. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM 4. JOB DESCRIPTIONS 5. MANUALS 6. NATIONAL INTERAGENCY INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
Series Data:Incident command system multi-casualty position manual
Availability:Not available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: REFERENCE [Status: NON-CIRCULATING]
 
 
Call Number:

TH 9504 .C2 ICS MC 222-7

Medical communications coordinator (rev. ed.)

Author(s):California. Office of Emergency Services. Operations Coordination Center.
Description: 5 p. (rev. ed.).
Publication Data:Riverside, CA : The Center. March 1993
Identifier/s:Misc. No.: ICS-MC-222-7/ Accession No.: 74658/ OCLC Record No.: 667623868
Type of Item: (BOOK) BOOK
Subjects:1. COMMUNICATIONS 2. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 3. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM 4. JOB DESCRIPTIONS 5. MANUALS 6. NATIONAL INTERAGENCY INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
Series Data:Incident command system multi-casualty position manual
Availability:Not available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: REFERENCE [Status: NON-CIRCULATING]
 
 
Call Number:

TH 9504 .C2 ICS MC 222-6

Medical supply coordinator (rev. ed.)

Author(s):California. Office of Emergency Services. Operations Coordination Center.
Description: 5 p. (rev. ed.).
Publication Data:Riverside, CA : The Center. March 1993
Identifier/s:Misc. No.: ICS-MC-222-6/ Accession No.: 74657/ OCLC Record No.: 667623866
Type of Item: (BOOK) BOOK
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 2. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM 3. JOB DESCRIPTIONS 4. MANUALS 5. NATIONAL INTERAGENCY INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 6. SUPPLIES
Series Data:Incident command system multi-casualty position manual
Availability:Not available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: REFERENCE [Status: NON-CIRCULATING]
 
 

The emergency medical coordinator - EMCs [in "INTERNATIONAL FIRE CHIEF"]

Author(s):Myrick, Justin A.
Description: In "INTERNATIONAL FIRE CHIEF". v. 47 (6) p. 11-13
Publication Data: June 1981
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 610035811
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL PERSONNEL 2. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 3. FIRST RESPONDERS 4. RURAL AREAS
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

14345

Fire department requirements of medical directors for EMS

Author(s):Gavin, Mike G. ; Poudre. Fire Authority.
Description: 31 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. November 20, 1996
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 86855/ OCLC Record No.: 502531737
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 2. FIRE DEPARTMENTS 3. MEDICAL DIRECTORS 4. QUALIFICATIONS
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • Most fire service organizations that provide emergency medical services have no way of knowing what to require of their EMS Medical Director. The purpose of this study was to identify key emergency medical service issues which Fire/EMS organizations should require regarding their Medical Director and explore methods utilized to maximize the Medical Directors performance. This study employed a historical descriptive methodology for research. The research questions to be asked were: 1. What are the required duties of the Medical Director for Fire/EMS organizations? 2. What are the required qualifications of the Medical Director for Fire/EMS organizations? 3. What positive actions can take place to assure Fire/EMS organizations obtain a quality Medical Director? A literature review at the Learning Resource Center of the National Fire Academy was employed to determine EMS Medical Director issues encountered by Fire/EMS organizations and explore methods to maximize their performance. Additionally a literature review at Poudre Fire Authority Library was also employed to determine EMS/Medical Director issues encountered by Fire/EMS organizations and explore methods to maximize their performance. Several interviews with fire service organizations which provide EMS were conducted to gather information relative to this research subject. The State of Colorado EMS Coordinator was also interviewed to gather information regarding Medical Director legalities in this state. A survey of Colorado Fire/EMS organizations was administered in an attempt to measure their Medical Director duties, qualifications and actions to assure quality from this position. Findings of this research indicate several necessary issues need to be addressed. First, you must understand the legal requirements of a Medical Director as mandated by federal, state and local law. Second, you must understand the duties of the Medical Director that would allow your system to provide the best service to all your customers. Third, Medical Directors must possess personal qualifications relative to those required duties. And fourth, a quality assurance process to assure good medical direction from the Medical Director must be in place. Recommendation of the research was that fire departments identify their role in EMS, understand and mandate the responsibilities the Medical Director must have to assist them in this endeavor and require qualifications the Medical Director needs to fulfill that role. There is great need for an Emergency Medical Service information source in the fire service. The fire service must operate as a business and treat the Medical Director like any other employee they work with. Fire/EMS organizations must develop a formal agreement and good working relations with the Medical Director. It is through his or her medical authority that emergency service organizations will protect the well being of their personnel and customers. And finally, fire service organizations along with Medical Directors must realize that they are no longer the only "Doc on the block" to do business with.
Notes:Fort Collins, CO; Advanced Leadership Issues in Emergency Medical Services; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]
 
 

The ultimate system evaluation [in "JEMS"]

Author(s):Oulman, Frank.
Description: In "JEMS". v. 16 (6) p. 28-30
Publication Data: June 1991
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 666755762
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE 2. HEART 3. TREATMENT
Notes:The author's personal account of his heart attack, emergency medical treatment and hospitalization. Mr. Oulman is an EMT-P and EMS coordinator for Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue and the City of Beaverton, OR.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 

The key to choosing your quality coordinator [in "JEMS"]

Author(s):Dick, Thom.
Description: In "JEMS". v. 15 (6) p. 83-85
Publication Data: June 1990
Identifier/s:OCLC Record No.: 666755598
Type of Item: (JOURNAL) JOURNAL
Subjects:1. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION 2. MANAGEMENT 3. QUALITY
Notes:A good quality coordinator needs to have certain attributes such as: patience, communication, vision, leadership, honesty and intelligence. He/she must also have good organizing skills.
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: JOURNAL ROOM - ROOM 201 [Status: IN]
 
 
Call Number:

25129

Viability of an expanded fire service role in the delivery of emergency medical services in Enfield, Connecticut

Author(s):Richards, Edward N. ; Enfield. Fire District No. 1.
Description: 93 p.
Publication Data:Emmitsburg, MD : National Fire Academy. November 1994
Identifier/s:Accession No.: 80321/ OCLC Record No.: 502522895
Type of Item: (EFO PAPER) EFO PAPER
Subjects:1. EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 2. FIRE SERVICE
Series Data:Executive Fire Officer Program. Applied Research Project
Summary/abstract:
  • The Enfield, Connecticut Police Department has begun abandoning Emergency Medical Services (EMS) delivery to a private provider which has resulted in increased response times, increased costs, and in some instances, unavailability of Advanced Life Support. The purpose of the research was to establish whether the fire service in Enfield should become involved in EMS delivery and if so, what alternatives for level of service were feasible for the fire service in that regard. Through a descriptive research method that focused primarily on personal interviews the following research questions were addressed: 1. What problems and pitfalls are likely to be encountered when the fire service becomes involved with Emergency Medical Service delivery? 2. What additional costs to the customer/taxpayer would result from the fire service assuming Emergency Medical Service functions? 3. What different levels or profiles of Emergency Medical Service are feasible in Enfield, vis a vis the current EMS "industry"? 4. Which State agencies must the fire service interact with and which regulations must the fire service comply with before the fire service could assume an expanded role in Emergency Medical Service? 5. What types and amount of staffing would be required based on current and projected emergency medical activity in Enfield? 6. What are the requirements for equipment deployment based on current and projected emergency medical activity in Enfield? Interviews were conducted with Chief Fire Officers whose departments are involved with EMS, Enfield Police Department administrators, the Chief of Field Services for the State Office of Emergency Medical Services (OEMS), the National Fire Academy's Program Chair for EMS, a major regional trauma center's EMS Coordinator, and the president or the private service provider in Enfield. Information from a feasibility report from an EMS committee commissioned by the Enfield Fire Chiefs' Association was integral to this project. Three publications in the International Association of Fire Chiefs' "Challenging The Fire Service" series that addresses EMS management issues for fire service leaders also provided substantial information for the project. The findings of the research indicate that an expanded fire service involvement in the delivery of EMS in Enfield was warranted. Three levels of service profiles were deemed feasible for the fire service: 1) The fire service provides the First Responder service. 2) The fire service provides the Basic Life Support ambulance transport service. 3) The fire service provides both First Responder and Basic Life Support ambulance transport services. A fourth profile available to the community was: The private service provides all Emergency Medical Services. The Town of Enfield should charter an EMS committee comprised of police, fire, town government, private service, hospitals, regional EMS council, and citizen representation. This concept is of paramount importance in formulating a plan to provide the best emergency medical care for the money within the scope of the dynamics of EMS evolution in Enfield and on a national basis. The fire service in Enfield should take initiative to become involved in the delivery of emergency medical care. The fire service has the potential to provide an excellent level of care to the citizens of Enfield. Fire service delivered emergency medical care, if properly implemented and managed, has distinct advantages over that provided entirely by a private service. Because the fire stations in Enfield are well distributed geographically, an advantage in response time is realized. The fire service already has a fairly large nucleus of personnel trained in emergency medical care. The fire service is not a "for profit" enterprise, so there is not an inordinate preoccupation with minimizing costs at the expense of excellent service.
Notes:Enfield, CT; Executive Development; Abstracts for EFO papers are written by the author
Availability:Available on Interlibrary Loan
Copies:
  • c.1: DOCUMENT ROOM - ROOM 209 [Status: IN]